Archived - Annual Report to Parliament on the Privacy Act
Canada Border Services Agency 2015-2016

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Table of Contents

Chapter One: Privacy Act Report

Introduction

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) is pleased to present to Parliament, in accordance with section 72 of the Privacy Act, its annual report on the management of thisAct. The report describes the activities that support compliance with the Privacy Act for the fiscal year commencing April 1, 2015, and ending March 31, 2016. During this period, the CBSA continued to build on successful practices implemented in previous years.

"The purpose of this Act is to extend the present laws of Canada that protect the privacy of individuals with respect to personal information about themselves held by a government institution and that provide individuals with a right of access to that information."Footnote 1

As stated in subsection 72(1) and 72(2) of the Privacy Act, "The head of every government institution shall prepare for submission to Parliament an annual report on the administration of this Act within the institution during each financial year … Every report prepared under subsection (1) shall be laid before each House of Parliament within three months after the financial year in respect of which it is made or, if that House is not then sitting, on any of the first fifteen days next thereafter that it is sitting."Footnote 2

Organization

I. About the Canada Border Services Agency

Since 2003, the CBSA has been an integral part of the Public Safety Canada (PS) portfolio, which was created to ensure coordination across all federal departments and agencies responsible for national security and the safety of Canadians.Footnote 3 The CBSA itself is responsible for providing integrated border services that support national security and public safety priorities and facilitate the free flow of persons and goods, including animals and plants, that meet all requirements under the program legislation.

The CBSA carries out its responsibilities with a workforce of approximately 13,000 employees, including over 7,200 uniformed CBSA officers who provide services at approximately 1,200 points across Canada and at 39 international locations.Footnote 4

II. Access to Information and Privacy Division

The Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) Division is comprised of five units: an Administration section, two Case Management units, and two Policy units. The Administration section's function is to receive all incoming requests and consultations, to ensure quality control of all outgoing correspondence, and to support both Case Management units in their day-to-day business. The Case Management units assign all branches and regions with retrieval requests and provide daily operational guidance and support to CBSA employees. The ATIP Policy and Governance unit develops policies, tools, and procedures to support ATIP requirements within the CBSA and provides training to employees. The Information Sharing and Collaborative Arrangement Policy unit maintains the policy framework for the CBSA's information-sharing and domestic written collaborative arrangements (WCA). On average, 55 full-time equivalents, four part-time and casual employees, and three consultants were employed in the ATIP Division during fiscal year 2015–2016.

The ATIP coordinator for the CBSA is the Director of the ATIP Division. The ATIP Division is part of the Corporate Secretariat which reports to the Vice-President of the Corporate Affairs Branch. Consistent with best practices identified by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS),Footnote 5 the CBSA's ATIP coordinator is positioned within three levels of the President and has full delegated authority, reporting directly to the Director General of the Corporate Secretariat, who in turn reports to the Vice-President of the Corporate Affairs Branch.

Key to maintaining compliance with the statutory time requirements of the Privacy Act is the ATIP Division's ability to obtain personal information from branches and regions in a timely and reliable manner. Supported by a network of 17 ATIP liaison officers across the CBSA, the ATIP Division is well positioned to receive, coordinate, and process requests for personal information under the Privacy Act.

The ATIP Division works closely with other members of the PS portfolio, including the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the Correctional Service of Canada, the Parole Board of Canada, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, to share best practices and develop streamlined processes for the retrieval of jointly held records within the 30-day legislated time frame required to respond to privacy requests.

Activities and Accomplishments

I. Performance

Fiscal year 2015–2016 saw high volumes of privacy requests made to the CBSA. The high volumes are largely attributable to individuals seeking copies of their history of arrival dates into Canada. In fiscal year 2015–2016, 78% of all the privacy requests received by the CBSA came from individuals seeking their Traveller History Report, information used to support residency requirements for programs administered by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC), and by Employment and Social Development Canada.

The CBSA saw record high volumes of privacy requests submitted through the "Access to Information and Privacy Online Request" tool. Through this tool, the Agency received 7,674 requests, which amounted to 68.2% of all privacy requests received by the CBSA.

The CBSA continued to offer the electronic format of responses to privacy requests. Although electronic format made up only 8.3% of all formal privacy requests that were either all disclosed or disclosed in part in fiscal year 2015–2016, these requests accounted for 80.3% of all the pages the CBSA disclosed in their entirety or disclosed in part this fiscal year.

The ATIP Division also provided case-by-case policy guidance to CBSA program areas related to the disclosure of information under section 8 of the Privacy Act and section 107 of the Customs Act. In total, the ATIP Division received 965 requests for guidance in fiscal year 2015–2016 representing an increase of 208% over the previous year.

II. Education and Training

In fiscal year 2014–2015, the ATIP Division continued to conduct bilingual training sessions that supported the implementation of streamlined processing procedures and built an awareness of ATIP obligations. These sessions are designed to ensure that the participants fully understand their responsibilities under the Privacy Act, with a focus on requests made pursuant to the Act and the duty‑to‑assist principles. Four sessions were offered with 74 National Capital Region (NCR) and regional employees taking part. 

CBSA employees also took advantage of the free online course entitled "Managing Information at the Canada Border Services Agency and the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act."This one-hour online course was designed to provide employees with the basic principles for effectively managing information in their daily work. After completing this course, an employee will have acquired the knowledge to better identify various types of information, learn how requests under the Access to Information Act and the Privacy Act are handled, and learn about their responsibilities throughout the process. A total of 204 employees completed the online training in fiscal year 2015–2016.

Moreover, the ATIP Division delivered 18 in-class training sessions on section 107 of the Customs Act, as well as basic information‑sharing training sessions to 260 employees in the NCR and across the regions. In addition, the ATIP Division developed and launched an interactive online training course for all CBSA personnel regarding information sharing which has been well-received. A total of 1,037 online sessions had been completed in fiscal year 2015–2016.

The ATIP Division also delivered a variety of information sessions on topics such as the implementation of the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act (SCISA), disclosure of intelligence-related information, and business line-specific training.

In addition, the ATIP Division organized a national ATIP liaison officers' learning event via conference call. The purpose of this conference call, which convened all 17 ATIP liaison officers across the branches and regions, was to exchange information about challenges and best practices, to discuss the latest policies and procedural developments, and, overall, to improve the ATIP Division/ATIP liaison officer relationship. Conference calls will be offered again next year to support continual improvement and to promote ongoing communication while providing the tools and training required by ATIP liaison officers to perform their duties.

The ATIP Division also developed a communications plan to raise employee awareness of their obligations under the Privacy Act. The plan leverages key dates, such as Data Privacy Day, and other activities at the CBSA that can promote ATIP tools, resources, and awareness.

Finally, the ATIP Division continues to actively participate in the TBS-led ATIP coordinators' and ATIP practitioners' meetings. These meetings provide opportunities for ATIP employees from the CBSA to liaise with employees from other institutions to discuss various issues and challenges that have been identified by the ATIP community.

III. New and Revised Privacy-related Policies and Procedures

During fiscal year 2015–2016, the CBSA continued to revise existing policies and to develop new ones.

The ATIP Division has taken a number of measures to enhance and promote ATIP tools that are readily accessible to CBSA employees. One of these measures is to keep the ATIP intranet site up‑to‑date and available to all CBSA employees. This allows the ATIP Division to quickly share information and best practices and to facilitate collaboration across the Agency.

In fiscal year 2015-2016, the ATIP Division reviewed and updated two key information sharing policy documents that address pro-active disclosures, as well as the Agency's implementation of SCISA. An update has also been completed on the policy guidance related to Investigative Body Designation.

The ATIP Division continued to provide the service of informally reviewing CBSA records for internal programs as if they had been requested under the Privacy Act. The ATIP Division received 91 internal requests of this nature in fiscal year 2015–2016.

The ATIP Division closely monitors the time it takes to process privacy requests. Monthly reports, which show trends and performance, are submitted to the managers of the Case Management units, the Director of the ATIP Division, and the Director General of the Corporate Secretariat. Monthly reports consisting of statistics on the performance of the offices of primary interest are also distributed to all ATIP liaison officers. Finally, quarterly trend reports portraying the overall performance of the Agency are reviewed and discussed during meetings of the Agency's Executive CommitteeFootnote 6 and are included in the Agency Performance Summary.

IV. Reading Room

The CBSA, in accordance with the Privacy Act, maintains a reading room for applicants who wish to review material in person at the CBSA. Applicants may access the reading room by contacting the CBSA's ATIP Director by telephone at 343-291-7021 or by sending an email to ATIP-AIPRP@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca. The reading room is located at:

Place Vanier Complex, 14th Floor, Tower A
333 North River Road
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0L8

V. Audits of, and investigations into the privacy practices of the Canada Border Services Agency

In 2015–2016, there was one audit concluded by the OPC, and one audit was initiated by the CBSA Internal Audit and Program Evaluation Directorate that relates to the access to information and privacy practices of the CBSA.

Office of the Privacy Commissioner – Audit – Privacy and Portable Storage Devices:

In January 2013, the OPC announced its intention to conduct an audit of the systematic challenges related to the use of portable electronic storage devices within federal institutions. As part of its audit planning process, the OPC conducted a survey regarding the use of portable storage devices by 49 federal institutions, including the CBSA. The survey was designed to facilitate the selection of 20 entities for audit examination.

Based on this survey, the CBSA was one of the 17 institutions selected by the OPC for review in 2014–2015. The purpose of the audit was to examine the frameworks in place to govern the use of portable electronic devices, with the objective of contributing to enhancing privacy protections.

The OPC's Summary Examination Report for this audit was published in December 2015. The following chart summarizes the OPC's recommendations and CBSA's Management Response:

OPC Recommendation CBSA Management Response
The CBSA should ensure that the issuance of all portable storage devices - that may be used to retain personal information - is recorded for identification and tracking purposes. Agreed - The CBSA will ensure that the issuance of all portable storage devices are inventoried, tracked, and labelled accordingly by July 2016.
The CBSA should retain documentary evidence - either the confirmation report generated by a certified cleansing mechanism or confirmation of physical destruction - as verification that all data on surplus or defective portable storage devices has been destroyed in a secure manner. Agreed - The CBSA will retain documentary evidence - either the confirmation report generated by a certified cleansing mechanism or confirmation of physical destruction - as verification that all data on surplus or defective portable storage devices has been destroyed in a secure manner by December 2015.
The CBSA should assess the risk to personal information resulting from the use of CDs/DVDs to store data, implement appropriate controls to address identified gaps and weaknesses. Agreed – The CBSA will assess the security risk associated with the use of CDs/DVDs, as well as the business impact of removing this feature by October 2016.
The CBSA should assess the use of, and controls on, portable storage devices within the context of the Agency’s own programs and environment, and implement appropriate controls to address identified gaps and weaknesses. Agreed - The CBSA will assess the use of, and controls on, portable storage devices within CBSA, and implement appropriate controls to address identified gaps and weaknesses by December 2016.
The CBSA should ensure that all employees, including contract personnel, are aware of the Agency’s policy regarding the use of privately-owned portable storage devices for work-related purposes. Agreed - The CBSA will ensure that all employees, including contract personnel, are aware by July 2016.

Canada Border Services Agency Internal Audit and Program Evaluation Directorate – Audit of the ATIP Division

As part of the CBSA Risk-Based Audit Plan 2014-2015 to 2016-2017, the CBSA Internal Audit and Program Directorate initiated an audit of the ATIP Division in 2015-2016. The objective of this audit is to assess the adequacy of the ATIP management control framework including the management of human resources business processes, to evaluate ATIP's compliance with legislative timelines, and controls that mitigate the risk of disclosing exempted information.

The CBSA Internal Audit and Program Evaluation Directorate's Report to Committee for this audit is expected to be completed in June 2016.

VI. Privacy Impact Assessments

In fiscal year 2015-2016, the CBSA completed nine PIAs, two of which were multi-institutional PIAs completed in conjunction with IRCC. 

The seven PIAs completed by the CBSA are:

The two multi-institutional PIAs, led by IRCC, are:

The following PIAs were submitted to the OPC, and TBS, for review and comments. 

The full executive summaries of these PIAs can be found on the CBSA's website.

Accounts Receivable Ledger

The Accounts Receivable Ledger (ARL) tracks import duties and taxes owing on the importation owing to the Receiver General of Canada on the importation of commercial goods. It contains personal information about importers, carriers, duty free shop owners, warehouse owners, and customs brokerages operating as sole proprietorships from CBSA legacy databases. Information may be validated for accuracy against existing collections of tombstone data held within databases and may be used to facilitate reimbursement of overpayment or to facilitate communications related to import/export processing. 

Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration

The Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration (AVRR) Pilot Program supports the Removals Program by providing a mechanism, delivered by the International Organization for Migration (IOM), to facilitate the voluntary removal of failed refugee claimants back to their country of origin. The Pilot was conducted in the Greater Toronto Area from June 29, 2012 to March 31, 2015. The PIA assesses the privacy implications of activities conducted both by the CBSA and by the IOM for the administration and delivery of the AVRR. The PIA does not assess privacy implications of activities performed by the CBSA as part of the regular removals process. 

Entry/Exit Phase II Addendum: United States Citizens Expansion

The Entry/Exit Phase II Addendum pertains to the inclusion of all foreign nationals and permanent residents crossing the shared land border between Canada and the United States (U.S.). Specifically, information on U.S. citizens entering either country via an automated port of entry along the land border will now be included under the scope of Entry/Exit. No information on Canadian citizens and Registered Indians will be exchanged under this addendum and no Entry/Exit information will be systematically shared outside of the CBSA.

Interactive Advance Passenger Information

The Interactive Advance Passenger Information (IAPI) program builds on the current Advance Passenger Information/Passenger Name Record (API/PNR) program, further to Beyond the Border Action Plan commitments.  Under IAPI, API data will be collected at check-in (which normally begins 24 hours prior to a flight's scheduled time of departure) to confirm if a traveller has prescribed documentation to travel to Canada or if a traveller is a prescribed person under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, and a "board/no-board" message will be sent to air carriers for all passengers expected to be on board all international commercial flights coming to Canada prior to flight departure. The process will include a manual review to determine whether a traveller is the subject of a declaration by the Minister under the Negative Discretion authority or if there exists an enforced removal order without the required Authorization to Return to Canada documentation or Temporary Resident Permit.

The scope of IAPI also provides for the collection of multiple pushes of PNR data beginning at 72 hours prior to departure, however only API will be used for IAPI's board/no-board process. The operationalization of pre-departure PNR pushes will come into effect at a later date, based on considerations such as ratification of the Canada-EU PNR Agreement or, if deemed necessary, national security interests.

Faces on the Move: Multi-camera screening

The Faces on the Move: multi-camera screening project is a two year project with a six-month technology demonstration phase to assess the readiness of face-recognition technology in a border operation environment. The CBSA will install additional cameras at a selected port of entry to the existing closed circuit television cameras, positioned at key areas to better capture images of travellers. The images of travellers will be compared with an established operational database of high-risk individuals known to be inadmissible to Canada to ensure they are interdicted prior to leaving the port of entry.

Federal Bureau of Investigation–Canada Border Services Agency Information Sharing Memorandum of Understanding

The Federal Bureau of Investigation-CBSA Information Sharing Memorandum of Understanding supplements existing agreements between Canada and the U.S. to enable the timely and direct sharing of information about individuals or organizations for which reasonable grounds exist to suspect that they may pose a border-related threat to the safety or security of individuals in either country.

Uniform Supply System

The CBSA Uniform Program procures uniform components and equipment, including soft body armour, for CBSA uniformed employees.  Employees order uniform components and equipment directly from Logistik Unicorp Inc. of Saint Jean, Quebec through the vendor's secure web portal.  Soft body armour is ordered by the CBSA's Uniform Program in Ottawa who receive, review and forward employee sizing information to Pacific Safety Products Inc. (PSP) of Arnprior, Ontario. This PIA identifies, assesses and mitigates risks to employee personal information disclosed to uniform vendors.

Canada/United States Immigration Information Sharing Treaty: Biometric-Based Immigration Information Sharing Implementing Arrangement

Canada and the U.S. have developed a query-based method of using anonymous fingerprint matching to confirm the identity of third country nationals and assist in sharing immigration information without sharing the fingerprints collected from clients.  The Implementing Arrangement outlines how IRCC and the CBSA will work with their U.S. counterpart immigration agencies to share immigration information while also protecting the privacy of their clients. Biometric-based Information Sharing is also governed by the Immigration Information Sharing Treaty (IIST) signed December 13, 2012.

Memorandum of Understanding  regarding the Exchange of Information between Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada / Canada Border Services Agency and the United Kingdom Home Office & Case-by-Case Annex

The updated Memorandum Regarding the Exchange of Information and its Case-by-Case Annex replace an existing arrangement in place since 1999 with the Home Office for ad hoc information sharing. The Case-by-case Annex to the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) puts in place privacy-sensitive conditions whereby Canada-based and overseas CBSA officers may exchange information with Home Office counterparts for the purpose of administering and enforcing immigration and citizenship law in either country. Case-by-case exchanges are based on a reason to suspect the exchange would yield information that is useful or relevant to said purpose. The MOU and Annex were signed on September 9, 2015 in London, England by the CBSA President and IRCC Deputy Minister.

Disclosures Made Pursuant to Paragraph 8(2)(e) of the Privacy Act

During the 2015–2016 fiscal year, 1,140 disclosures, pursuant to paragraph 8(2)(e) of the Privacy Act, were made by the CBSA.

Disclosures Made Pursuant to Paragraph 8(2)(m) of the Privacy Act

During the 2015–2016 fiscal year, the CBSA made two disclosures related to immigration removals, pursuant to paragraph 8(2)(m) of the Privacy Act. In both cases, three data elements were disclosed by the CBSA: the removal, the date of the removal, and the location to which the individual was removed. 

It is in the public interest to demonstrate that the CBSA is carrying out its mandate. These disclosures served to demonstrate that the objectives and integrity of the immigration system and the protection of the health and safety of Canadians were being maintained. The balance between the public's need to know and protection of an individual's privacy is of utmost concern to the CBSA, and in each case, it was determined that public interest in the disclosure of these individual's removal status outweighed any injury to the individuals.

In all cases, the OPC was notified before the disclosures were made.

Delegation Order

See Annex A for a signed copy of the delegation order.

Chapter Two: Statistical Report

Statistical report on the Privacy Act

See Annex B for the CBSA's statistical report on the Privacy Act.

Interpretation of the statistical report

I. Requests Processed Under the Privacy Act

The CBSA received 11,247 privacy requests in fiscal year 2015–2016, which was a decrease of 11.9% over the previous year. Moreover, the CBSA responded to 11,400 Privacy Act requests, representing 85.7% of the total number of requests received and outstanding from the previous reporting period. 

Over the past six years, the CBSA has experienced a significant increase in the number of requests. In 2010–2011, the CBSA received 2,896 requests. By comparison, the Agency received 11,247 requests in 2015–2016. This increase is largely attributable to requests for the Traveller History Report referenced earlier in this report. 

Access to Information Requests Received/Completed

Traveller History Report Workload

II. Outstanding requests from previous years

Over the past six years, the CBSA has experienced a significant increase in the number of outstanding requests carried over to the next reporting period. Of the 1,902 requests carried over in fiscal year 2015-2016, 1,233 were on-time, and 669 were late.

III. Completion Time

Of all the requests completed, the CBSA was successful in responding to 88.7% of them within the legislated timelines, a decrease from the 97.4% achieved last fiscal year.

In total, 1,478 extensions were applied for in fiscal year 2015–2016. This represents an increase of 366% in extensions in comparison to the previous fiscal year.

IV. Complaints and investigations

Subsection 29(1) of the Privacy Act describes how the OPC receives and investigates complaints from individuals regarding their personal information held by a government institution. Examples of complaints the OPC may choose to investigate include a refusal of access to personal information; an allegation that personal information about them held by a government institution has been misused or wrongfully disclosed;or individuals given access to personal information not in the official language requested.

Throughout fiscal year 2015–2016, 34 Privacy Act complaints were filed against the CBSA, which represents a decrease of 6% compared to fiscal year 2014–2015. An assessment of the complaints filed against the CBSA does not reveal any particular pattern or specific reason for the decrease in complaints. It should also be noted that the number of complaints filed relate to 0.3% of the privacy requests completed during this period. The complaints received during the fiscal year were related to the following issues: time delay (27); application of exemptions or exclusions (3); use and disclosure (1); refusal to disclose (2); and miscellaneous (1).  

Of the 31 complaints resolved in fiscal year 2015–2016, 17 were deemed well-founded, nine were deemed not well-founded, one was settled, and four were discontinued. Where complaints are substantiated, the matter is reviewed by the delegated managers and processes are adjusted if required.

V. Privacy Breaches

There were no material privacy breaches reported during the 2015–2016 fiscal year.

VI. Conclusion

The achievements portrayed in this report reflect the CBSA’s commitment to ensuring that every reasonable effort is made to meet its obligations under the Privacy Act. The CBSA strives to provide Canadians with their personal information to which they have a right in a timely and helpful manner, while protecting the privacy rights of all Canadians.

Annex A – Delegation Order

The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, pursuant to section 73 of the Access to Information Act and section 73 of the Privacy Act, hereby designates the persons holding thepositions set out in the schedule hereto, or the persons occupying on an acting basis those positions, to exercise the powers, duties and functions of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness as the head of Canada Border Services Agency under the provisions of the Act and related regulations set out in the schedule opposite each position. This designation replaces all previous delegation orders.

Schedule Canada Border Services Agency
Position Access to Information Act and Regulations Privacy Act and Regulations
President Full Authority Full Authority
Executive Vice-President Full Authority Full Authority
Vice-President, Corporate Affairs Branch Full Authority Full Authority
Director General, Corporate Secretariat Full Authority Full Authority
Director, ATIP Division Full Authority Full Authority
Manager, ATIP Division Full Authority Full Authority 
(except 8(2)(m))
Team Leader, ATIP Division Full Authority Full Authority 
(except 8(2)(m))

Annex B – Statistical Report on the Privacy Act

Part 1 — Requests under the Privacy Act

  Number of Requests
Received during reporting period 11247
Outstanding from previous reporting period 2055
Total 13302
Closed during reporting period 11400
Carried over to next reporting period 1902

Part 2 — Requests closed during the reporting period

2.1 Disposition and completion time
Disposition of requests Completion Time
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 57 4475 2462 282 7 2 0 7285
Disclosed in part 16 1297 881 216 71 97 39 2617
All exempted 0 3 4 3 0 2 0 12
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
No records exist 34 257 148 16 1 0 0 456
Request abandoned 672 258 63 20 4 2 11 1030
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 779 6290 3558 537 83 103 50 11400
2.2 Exemptions
Section Number of requests
18(2) 0
19(1)(a) 321
19(1)(b) 36
19(1)(c) 18
19(1)(d) 61
19(1)(e) 0
19(1)(f) 0
20 0
21 507
22(1)(a)(i) 39
22(1)(a)(ii) 22
22(1)(a)(iii) 7
22(1)(b) 1184
22(1)(c) 10
22(2) 0
22.1 0
22.2 0
22.3 0
23(a) 0
23(b) 0
24(a) 0
24(b) 0
25 2
26 2213
27 224
28 0
2.3 Exclusions
Section Number of requests
69(1)(a) 0
69(1)(b) 0
69.1 0
70(1) 0
70(1)(a) 0
70(1)(b) 0
70(1)(c) 0
70(1)(d) 0
70(1)(e) 0
70(1)(f) 0
70.1 0
2.4 Format of information released
Disposition Paper Electronic Other formats
All disclosed 7201 84 0
Disclosed in part 1880 736 1
Total 9081 820 1

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed
Disposition of requests Number of pages processed Number of pages disclosed Number of requests
All disclosed 7201 84 0
Disclosed in part 1880 736 1
Total 9081 820 1
2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests
Disposition Less than 100 pages processed 101-500 pages processed 501-1000 pages processed 1001-5000 pages processed More than 5000 pages processed
Number of Requests Pages disclosed Number of Requests Pages disclosed Number of Requests Pages disclosed Number of Requests Pages disclosed Number of Requests Pages disclosed
All disclosed 7282 21745 3 373 0 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 2076 29465 435 71594 70 32499 35 37617 1 20095
All exempted 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned  1024 0 3 0 1 0 2 0 0 0
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 10394 51210 441 71967 71 32499 37 37617 1 20095
2.5.3 Other complexities
Disposition Consultation required Legal advice sought Interwoven Information Other Total
All disclosed 0 0 0 0 0
Disclosed in part 117 1 2181 4 2303
All exempted 1 0 1 0 2
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0
Request abandoned 6 0 31 0 37
Neither confirmed nor denied 0 0 0 0 0
Total 124 1 2213 4 2342

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline
Number of requests closed past the statutory deadline Principal Reason
Workload External consultation Internal consultation Other
1287 1287 0 0 0
2.6.2 Number of days past deadline
Number of days past deadline Number of requests past deadline where no extension was taken Number of requests past deadline where an extension was taken Total
1 to 15 days 692 43 735
16 to 30 days 129 9 138
31 to 60 days 107 16 123
61 to 120 days 85 34 119
121  to 180 days 46 18 64
181 to 365 days 39 29 68
More than 365 days 7 33 40
Total 1105 182 1287
2.7 Requests for translation
Translation Requests Accepted Refused Total
English to French  0 0 0
French to English  0 0 0
Total 0 0 0

Part 3 — Disclosures under subsection 8(2) and 8(5)

Paragraph 8(2)(e) Paragraph 8(2)(m) Paragraph 8(5) Total
1140 2 2 1144

Part 4 — Requests for correction of personal information and notations

Disposition for correction requests received Number
Notations attached 30
Requests for correction accepted 6
Total 36

Part 5 — Extensions

5.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests
Disposition of requests where an extension was taken 15(a)(i) Interference with operations 15(a)(ii) Consultation 15(b) Translation or conversion
Section 70 Other
All disclosed 907 0 32 0
Disclosed in part 214 0 174 0
All exempted 7 0 1 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0
No records exist 46 0 1 0
Request abandoned 88 0 8 0
Total 1262 0 216 0
5.2 Length of extensions
Length of extensions 15(a)(i) Interference with operations 15(a)(ii) Consultation 15(b) Translation purposes
Section 70 Other
1 to 15 days 0 0 5 0
16 to 30 days 1262 0 211 0
Total 1262 0 216 0

Part 6 — Consultations received from other institutions and organizations

6.1 Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations
Consultations Other government of Canada institutions Number of pages to review Other organizations Number of pages to review
Received during the reporting period 60 1233 2 7
Outstanding from the previous reporting period 7 473 0 0
Total 67 1706 2 7
Closed during the reporting period 61 1303 2 7
Pending at the end of the reporting period 6 403 0 0
6.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 9 5 3 1 0 1 1 20
Disclosed in part 2 15 3 2 1 6 1 30
All exempted 1 5 2 0 1 0 0 9
All excluded 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 12 26 8 4 2 7 2 61
6.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations
Recommendation Number of days required to complete consultation requests
1 to 15 days 16 to 30 days 31 to 60 days 61 to 120 days 121 to 180 days 181 to 365 days More than 365 days Total
All disclosed 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2
Disclosed in part 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All exempted 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All excluded 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Consult other institution 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

Part 7 — Completion time of consultations on Cabinet confidences

7.1 Requests with legal services
Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000 Pages Processed 1001-5000 Pages Processed More than 5000 Pages Processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7.2 Requests with Privy Council Office
Number of Days Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed 101-500 Pages Processed 501-1000 Pages Processed 1001-5000 Pages Processed More than 5000 Pages Processed
Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed Number of requests Pages disclosed
1 to 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
16 to 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
31 to 60 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
61 to 120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
121 to 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
181 to 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More than 365 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Part 8 - Complaints and investigations notices received

Section 31 Section 33 Section 35 Court action Total
33 23 19 0 75

Part 9 - Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs)

Number of PIA(s) completed 9

Part 10 — Resources related to the Privacy Act

10.1 Costs
Expenditures Amount
Salaries  $4,279,515
Overtime $124,787
Goods and Services $1,039,816
• Professional services contracts $724,300  
• Other $315,516  
Total $5,444,118
10.2 Human Resources
Resources Dedicated full-time
Full-time employees 54.92
Part-time and casual employees 3.54
Regional staff 0.00
Consultants and agency personnel 3.00
Students 0.00
Total 61.46
Note: Enter values to two decimal places.
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