ACI - Marine Mode
Marine Cargo Report – SO83

Data Requirements

The marine carrier, or its agent on the carrier’s behalf, prepares and transmits the Marine Cargo Report (SO83) to the CBSA through Electronic Data Interchange (EDI). The Marine Cargo Report must be transmitted electronically to the CBSA at least 24 hours before loading the cargo at a foreign port (not including the U.S.). For cargo loaded in the U.S., the Cargo Report must be transmitted at least 24 hours before arrival. If the duration of the voyage is less than required ACI cargo timeframe, the Cargo Report must be transmitted before departure of the vessel.

For additional information on conveyance pre-arrival procedures, refer to Memorandum D3-5-1 - Marine Pre-load/Pre-arrival and Reporting Requirements

The following provides information on ACI Marine Cargo Reports (SO83) to assist clients in meeting CBSA requirements:

Cargo Control Number (CCN)

The Cargo Control Number (CCN) is a number assigned to a document, which consists of a CBSA-approved carrier code followed by a unique reference number assigned by the Carrier. The CCN is the identifying reference number of the Marine Cargo Report (SO83).

The CCN is a unique number and cannot be re-used for a period of three years. As per the Transportation of Goods Regulations, the three-year period commences on the first day of January following the calendar year during which the goods were transported.

The CCN should reflect the CBSA-approved carrier code of the marine carrier. The format for a CCN is:

First four characters: Carrier Code
Remaining characters: unique reference number assigned by the carrier or his representative

Various ACI Marine Circumstances

Sub-location code for the Customs Office of Manifest Destination

The Sub-location code for the Customs Office of Manifest Destination is the CBSA office code for the warehouse associated to the customs office where the goods are destined upon their arrival in Canada. A sub-location code consists of a four-digit identification number where the primary cargo control number is to be acquitted. The Sub-location code for the Customs Office of Manifest Destination is a mandatory data element for all import shipments on the Marine Cargo Report (SO83), and must be a valid ACROSS Sub-location code. To find out additional information on sub-location codes, visit the sufferance warehouse operators section.

Bulk and Break-bulk Cargo

Definitions

The CBSA defines bulk cargo as "goods that are loose or in mass, such that they are confined only by the permanent structures of a vessel, without intermediate containment or intermediate packaging." Bulk cargo is composed of either: free flowing articles such as oil, grain, coal, ore and the like, which generally must be shoveled, pumped, blown, scooped or forked in handling; or uniform cargo that stows as solidly as bulk cargo and requires mechanical handling for lading and discharging.

To be classified as bulk, the cargo must not be containerized and must be easily identifiable as laden on the vessel. Any bundling of the cargo must only be for the purposes of securing the cargo. The CBSA's definition of bulk cargo is harmonized with the United States Customs and Border Protection's (U.S. CBP) definition for bulk cargo. Therefore, carriers who report their cargo as bulk to U.S. CBP will report the same cargo as bulk to the CBSA.

Break-bulk cargo is defined as cargo that is not containerized and that cannot be classified as "bulk" cargo under the above definition, but which is otherwise packaged and bundled.

The difference between bulk and break-bulk cargo is based not only on the type of cargo, but also on the way in which the cargo is stowed or loaded.

Supplementary Data Required Indicator

A "Y" or "N" indicator on the Marine Cargo Report informs the CBSA that further information is forthcoming in the form of a Supplementary Cargo (SO687) or House Bill (SO950) transmission.

Consignee

Transmitting "To Order" Shipments

The CBSA acknowledges that "To Order" in the consignee field is a common business practice. Therefore, the CBSA will accept "To Order"; "To Order of Shipper"; or "To Order of Bank"; or "Other Named Entity" in the consignee field provided the name and address of the owner or owner's representative is transmitted in the Notify Party loop.

To help clarify, the following examples illustrate the CBSA's requirements:

Example 1: "To Order" and "To Order of Shipper"

The CBSA will accept "To Order" and "To Order of Shipper" in the consignee name field. The address information, city name, and country code are mandatory fields for the consignee and ideally the Shipper's coordinates would be repeated. However, the CBSA will accept terms such as "Same as Shipper"; "See Above"; etc., in the address information field and city name.

The country code must be reported as a two alpha ISO 3166 Country Code. The name and address of the owner or owner's representative would be provided in the Notify Party loop. The delivery address, if different, would be reported in the Delivery Address loop.

Example 2: "To Order of Bank or Other Named Entity"

The name of the bank or the named entity would be reported in the consignee name field. Again, because the address information, city name, and country code are mandatory fields, the complete address of the bank, or other named entity, would be reported in the consignee name and address fields. The ultimate consignee's name and address would be reported in the Notify Party loop. The delivery address, if different, would be reported in the Delivery Address loop.

Non-Resident Importer as Consignee

The CBSA will accept a non-resident importer name and address in the consignee name and address field. However, a Canadian name and address must also be reported in the delivery address field.

Moving Company (Personal effects)

When personal effects are being imported into Canada the ultimate consignee is always required. The name of the moving company could be provided in the Notify Party field.

In-Transit Shipments

Contract of carriage ends in the U.S.
For this scenario, goods are travelling to Canada by ship and will then travel by truck or rail to the U.S. under the marine carrier's bond. The in transit indicator would be provided. The ultimate U.S. consignee name and address would be provided in the consignee name and address fields.

Goods are in transit to the U.S. but the carrier's contract of carriage ends in Canada
Even if the contract of carriage ends in Canada, the CBSA requires that all carriers who are aware that the shipment is in transit, report their cargo as per scenario one above, with the in transit indicator.

The CBSA acknowledges that if the contract of carriage ends in Canada, carriers are not always aware that the shipment is in transit. It would therefore be difficult in these situations for the CBSA to demand that the carrier report the shipment as an in transit when they do not have information or knowledge that the goods will be leaving Canada. If this is the case, the requirements differ based on whether Supplementary Cargo Report(s) were involved.

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