Canada Border Services Agency
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Memorandum D19-1-1

Ottawa, March 9, 2011

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In Brief

Food, Plants, Animals and Related Products

The Appendix was revised to reflect a change of address and contact numbers for the Ontario ports of entry. Only the Appendix page of Memorandum D19-1-1 dated June 29, 2010 is replaced.

1. This memorandum contains the applicable legislation and guidelines that apply to commercial and non-commercial importations of food, plants, animals (FPA) and related products in relation to the following goods:

  • (a) Live Animals (including animal embryos, hatching eggs, honey bees and semen)
  • (b) Products of Animal Origin (including honey)
  • (c) Animal Feeds
  • (d) Edible Meat and Meat Products
  • (e) Dairy Products
  • (f) Eggs and Processed Egg Products (including inedible products)
  • (g) Fish and Fish Products
  • (h) Fresh Fruits and Vegetables (for consumption or processing)
  • (i) Processed Fruits and Vegetables, and Maple Products
  • (j) Grains, Seeds, and Nuts for Human Consumption
  • (k) Seeds for Propagation
  • (l) Plants and Plant Products
  • (m) Fertilizers, Soil Supplements and Growing Media
  • (n) Biological Material
  • (o) Soil and Related Matter (including goods contaminated with)

2. This memorandum does not include the requirements of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), or the Fisheries Act and the Fish Health Protection Regulations. This information is contained in Memoranda D19-7-1, Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), and D19-8-2, Fisheries Act – Fish Health Protection Regulations, which may be found on the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) Web site at www.cbsa.gc.ca.

Table of Contents

Legislation

(excerpt)

Canada Border Services Agency Act

2. The following definitions apply in this Act:

"Program legislation" means any other Act of Parliament or any instrument made under it, or any part of such an Act or instrument,

(b) that the Governor in Council or Parliament authorizes the Minister, the Agency, the President or an employee of the Agency to enforce, including the Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act, the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Feeds Act, the Fertilizers Act, the Fish Inspection Act, the Health of Animals Act, the Meat Inspection Act, the Plant Protection Act and the Seeds Act;

5. (1) The Agency is responsible for providing integrated border services that support national security and public safety priorities and facilitate the free flow of persons and goods, including animals and plants, that meet all requirements under the program legislation, by

(a) supporting the administration or enforcement, or both, as the case may be, of the program legislation;

Customs Act

Disposition of goods imported that contravene legislation administered by CFIA should be dealt with in accordance with that legislation. Where no disposition provisions exist, the goods are to be disposed of pursuant to sections 101 and 102 of the Customs Act. Under the Customs Act, the CBSA has the authority to detain, inspect, dispose of, or refuse entry to goods on behalf of other government departments and agencies under the following legislative provisions:

Section 101: "Goods that have been imported or are about to be exported may be detained by an officer until he is satisfied that the goods have been dealt with in accordance with this Act, and any other Act of Parliament that prohibits, controls or regulates the importation or exportation of goods, and any regulations made thereunder."

Subsection 102 (1): "Goods that have been imported in contravention of this or any other Act of Parliament, or any regulation made thereunder, and that have been detained under section 101 shall be disposed of in accordance with that Act or regulation, but, where there is no provision in that Act or regulation for the disposition of such goods, the importer may abandon the goods to Her Majesty in right of Canada in accordance with section 36 or export them."

Subsection 36 (1): "The owner of goods that have been imported but have not been released may, with the authorization of an officer and subject to the conditions set out in subsection (2), abandon the goods to Her Majesty in right of Canada."

Subsection 36 (2): "Any person who abandons goods to Her Majesty under subsection (1) is liable for all reasonable expenses incurred by Her Majesty in the disposal of the goods where they are disposed of otherwise than by sale."

Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act – Section 11

11. (1) The Agency is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act, Canada Agricultural Products Act, Feeds Act, Fertilizers Act, Fish Inspection Act, Health of Animals Act, Meat Inspection Act, Plant Breeder's Rights Act, Plant Protection Act and Seeds Act.

(2) The Agency is responsible for the enforcement of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act as it relates to food, as that term is defined in section 2 of the Food and Drugs Act.

(3) The Agency is responsible for

  • (a) the enforcement of the Food and Drugs Act as it relates to food, as defined in section 2 of that Act; and
  • (b) the administration of the provisions of the Food and Drugs Act as they relate to food, as defined in section 2 of that Act, except those provisions that relate to public health, safety or nutrition.

(4) The Minister of Health is responsible for establishing policies and standards relating to the safety and nutritional quality of food sold in Canada and assessing the effectiveness of the Agency's activities related to food safety.

The CFIA is also responsible for the administration and enforcement of the following legislative authorities under the Canada Agricultural Products Act and its Regulations:

  • (a) Dairy Products Regulations
  • (b) Egg Regulations
  • (c) Processed Egg Regulations
  • (d) Livestock and Poultry Carcass Grading Regulations
  • (e) Processed Products Regulations
  • (f) Honey Regulations
  • (g) Maple Products Regulations
  • (h) Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Regulations
  • (i) Licensing and Arbitration Regulations

Guidelines and General Information

Responsibilities of the CBSA and the CFIA

1. In 2003, the CBSA assumed responsibility for the initial import inspection services in respect of the Acts and Regulations administered by the CFIA to the extent that they are applicable at Canadian border points. The CFIA retains responsibility for the enforcement of those Acts to the extent that they apply within Canada and at its National Import Service Centre (NISC). The CFIA and the CBSA have since signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) which outlines the administrative and operational roles and responsibilities of the two agencies with respect to the import, export and in-transit movement of food, plants, animals and related products.

CFIA Import Requirements

2. CFIA’s Automated Import Reference System (AIRS) should be used as the first step to determine import requirements. AIRS is an online tool that is a user-friendly, searchable database, which contains up-to-date listings of CFIA import directives, regulatory requirements and release instructions to the CBSA. Through a series of questions and answers about the Harmonized System (HS) Code, origin, destination, end use and miscellaneous qualifiers of the product you wish to import, the system will lead you through the applicable regulations and policies to information on all CFIA import requirements for specific FPA or related goods. The link to AIRS can be found at www.inspection.gc.ca/english/imp/airse.shtml. When using AIRS to search for a particular commodity, one or more of the following search criteria is needed:

  • (a) HS Description
  • (b) HS Code
  • (c) Alternate Description
  • (d) Key Words
  • (e) Latin Name

3. Some import requirements of other government departments, such as Environment Canada and Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, are also listed in AIRS; however, it is the responsibility of the importer to determine other import requirements.

4. As a reference, below are terms used in AIRS under “Recommendations to CBSA/Documentation and Registration Requirements.” The terms, as they appear in AIRS, are listed below in bold and are followed by a brief explanation.

  • (a) Approved: The commodity is admissible to Canada. No document is required, therefore, no verification required by the CFIA’s NISC. The commodity may be released by the CBSA if it meets all other CBSA entry requirements.
  • (b) Approved (must be accompanied by the following documents or registration): The commodity may be imported to Canada provided the importer submits the documents listed in AIRS to the CBSA for review (these must be legible, complete, signed, etc). The commodity may be released by the CBSA if documentation requirements are met and if the commodity meets all other CBSA entry requirements.
  • (c) Refer to CFIA – Veterinary inspection: The commodity may be imported to Canada but requires an inspection by a designated veterinarian at the first point of arrival prior to release by the CBSA.
  • (d) Refer to CFIA – NISC: The NISC must receive a request for documentation review with all required documents prior to release of the commodity by the CBSA. The CFIA decision will be stamped on CFIA Form 5272, Request for Documentation Review (paper request), or returned by Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) through ACROSS.
  • (e) No CFIA requirement: The commodity is not regulated by the CFIA. Restrictions or requirements of other government departments (OGD) may apply.
  • (f) CBSA inspection: The commodity may be imported into Canada provided a visual inspection by a border services officer confirms that import conditions have been met (e.g. used agricultural equipment).
  • (g) CBSA inspection – Border services officers trained and authorized in FPA inspection (must be accompanied by the following documents/ registrations): The commodity may be imported into Canada provided the importer submits the documents listed in AIRS to the CBSA for review (these must be legible, complete, signed, etc). A visual inspection of the commodity and/or review of the documents must be done by a border services officer.
  • (h) Refuse entry: The commodity cannot be imported into Canada except if accompanied by an exemption letter or a CFIA special permit, in which case an NISC release recommendation is mandatory.
  • Note: Border lookouts and targets take precedence over any import recommendation indicated in AIRS.

5. Commercial importations must also meet the CFIA’s labelling requirements. The CFIA regulates the packaging, labelling, composition, and net quantity requirements for most foods under the following legislation:

  • (a) the Canada Agricultural Products Act and its Regulations;
  • (b) the Meat Inspection Act and its Regulations;
  • (c) the Food and Drugs Act and its Regulations; and
  • (d) the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act and its Regulations.

6. The CBSA assists the CFIA with the administration of the above-named Acts and Regulations as they relate to packaging and labelling, through the detection and notification of possible infractions. However, the CBSA does not enforce these requirements. AIRS outlines these basic requirements and gives information on the services provided by the CFIA with respect to packaging and labelling requirements.

National Import Service Centre (NISC)

7. To simplify and enhance the import process, the CFIA has established the NISC, which is staffed by specially-trained import specialists. They review import documentation, process import requests for certain FPA and related goods, and then return a recommendation decision either electronically to the CBSA or by fax directly to the client. They also handle telephone inquiries regarding the import requirements for all commodities regulated by the CFIA and, when necessary, coordinate inspections for import shipments. The NISC provides border services officers, importers, exporters, brokers and travellers with a single-point contact for information and advice concerning FPA goods.

8. For inquiries that require an explanation of the CFIA policy or that deal with the legislation of FPA import requirements, contact the NISC for assistance.

9. The NISC’s business hours and contact numbers are available at the following site: www.inspection.gc.ca.

National Import Service Centre
7:00 a.m. to 03:00 a.m. (Eastern Time)
Telephone and EDI: 1-800-835-4486
(Canada or U.S.A.)
1-905-795-7834 (local calls and all other countries)
Facsimile: 1-905-795-9658

Mailing Address:
1050 Courtney Park Drive East
Mississauga, Ontario
L5T 2R4

10. The NISC makes various recommendation decisions to the CBSA. As a reference, the following are CFIA recommendations, which may be stamped on import documents, included in the comments section of the “Request for Documentation Review” form, or transmitted electronically via EDI:

  • (a) Approved: The commodity is regulated by the CFIA and meets CFIA import requirements. The name and signature of the import specialist who reviewed the documentation appears with the current date.
  • (b) Refused: The commodities do not meet CFIA import requirements.
  • (c) CBSA to release as per D19-1-1/AIRS: The import release request of low-risk commodities is reviewed by a border services officer and may be released by the CBSA according to AIRS recommendations. This stamp, therefore, is not a release recommendation itself.
  • (d) CFIA-report to CFIA border inspector and CFIA inspection required: The commodity requires a veterinary inspection or a plant inspector examination at point of entry when CBSA does not have the expertise to do so.
  • (e) CFIA-report to CBSA border inspector and contact CBSA for further options: The commodity requires a specific action by the border services officer at the first point of entry (e.g. documentation review or visual inspection, disposal of goods, removal from Canada, etc.). A note is also added with the NISC phone number for the border services officer to contact with further information that the NISC may require prior to making a decision.
  • (f) Do not open or sell the product until it has been inspected by the CFIA at destination: The commodity requires an inspection by a CFIA inspector at destination.
  • (g) Please refer shipment to Health Canada: The NISC Import Specialist believes that the commodity is regulated by Health Canada and may have other OGD requirements.
  • Note: Remember that CFIA import requirements are subject to change at any time. Always consult with AIRS for the most up-to-date information. If AIRS is temporarily unavailable, contact the NISC.

Reporting to the CBSA at the First Point of Arrival

11. In addition to meeting CFIA import requirements, all goods must meet CBSA reporting and admissibility requirements. The admissibility decision for all commodities is made at the first point of arrival in Canada.

12. All importations must be reported to the CBSA at the first point of arrival in Canada. Reporting for commercial shipments is done by way of a release entry package in paper format, submitted in person by the carrier/importer/ broker either upon arrival or in advance (for paper entries, fax submissions are another option), or electronically via Electronic Data Interchange (EDI).

13. Under certain conditions, as described in Memorandum D3-1-1, Policy Respecting the Importation and Transportation of Goods, shipments may be allowed to proceed inland, in-bond where formal release procedures will be followed and compliance to requirements of other government departments and agencies verified. Note: When the AIRS recommendation is “Refer to CFIA”, approval from the CFIA NISC or veterinarian must be received before any movement of animals or goods is permitted into Canada. This also applies for in-transit shipments.

14. After clearance, final accounting documents must be submitted if not already provided upon entry. The final accounting package can be found on the CBSA’s Web site at www.cbsa.gc.ca/import.

15. Documentation must be completed for both paper and electronic submissions. For EDI reporting, documentation will be kept on file by the importer as a record for inspection and audit purposes.

16. For every shipment of FPA goods requiring release approval from the NISC, CFIA form 5272, “Request for Documentation Review” must be submitted to the NISC. A customs transaction number is mandatory for all import requests and should appear on form 5272. For paper submissions, the cover sheet will be stamped by the NISC to inform importers/brokers and the CBSA of the CFIA decision. For EDI transmissions, the CBSA will receive electronic notification of the CFIA decision housed on form 5272 within the Accelerated Commercial Release Operations Support System (ACROSS) database.

17. Certain goods are only admissible to Canada with the necessary CFIA import permits, as indicated in AIRS, which are to be submitted to the NISC together with form 5272. The forms necessary to obtain the required permits can be found on the CFIA’s Web site at www.inspection.gc.ca. Importers should note that these forms may differ from the ones they receive from the country of export.

18. Documentation submitted to the CBSA must be complete. Importers and brokers are advised that incomplete or missing documentation will result in delays, refusal or an Administrative Monetary Penalty (AMP).

19. The CBSA date stamps all paper 5272 forms and files them internally. All other permits, certificates, declarations, and other documents submitted to support the release of a shipment, as previously submitted to the NISC, are to be maintained by the importer/broker responsible for the shipment. Applicable documents are forwarded to the CFIA in accordance with established procedures. For further details, please refer to the “Info Kit for Brokers”: www.inspection.gc.ca.

20. Live animals that require an inspection by a CFIA inspector/veterinarian, as indicated in AIRS, are inspected at points of entry. Importers are to contact the veterinary inspection service closest to the point of entry, prior to arrival, when these services are required. The animal health offices are available on the CFIA’s Web site at www.inspection.gc.ca. The inspection result must be made available to the CBSA before the shipment is released.

21. All live animals that are to be imported into Canada, whether regulated or not, are to be handled and transported in a manner that prevents injury and unnecessary suffering. Downed, injured, sick or unhealthy animals at the border are humane transport issues and will be referred to a CFIA veterinarian. For more information on the humane transport of animals requirements as set out in the Health of Animal Regulations refer to the CFIA’s Web site: www.inspection.gc.ca.

22. All wood packaging made of solid wood (excluding manufactured wood and paper products) used in packaging, supporting, protecting, bracing or carrying a commodity, including dunnage for commercial imports, regardless of commodity, is subject to the following import requirements:

  • (a) it must be heat treated, or
  • (b) marked (stamped into the wood), or
  • (c) have a valid Phytosanitary Certificate (not accepted for shipments from China), and,
  • (d) in all cases, must be free from living pests.

23. The regulation does not differentiate among types of loads or types of entry document. Wood packaging is either compliant or non-compliant and will be handled accordingly. Wood packaging found to be non-compliant with the Government of Canada’s import requirements will be refused entry into the country.

24. All goods found to be contaminated with soil are refused entry and ordered removed from Canada at the first point of entry.

25. For more information on importing and exporting commodities to and from Canada refer to the CBSA Web site at www.cbsa.gc.ca.

Health of Animals Documentation

26. For live animals and edible meat and meat products, various documentation requirements may apply. Health of animals documentation is required to ensure that animals that are to be imported to Canada are free of diseases that can threaten the health of Canadians and cause multi-million-dollar losses. The international marketability of our animals and their products and by-products is enhanced by Canada’s reputation for being free from certain serious diseases. Import and documentation requirements for animals vary depending on country of export and on the species. AIRS indicates the most-up-to-date documentation requirements and it is a good idea to verify with the NISC if additional import documentation is required. In many cases, the CFIA charges additional fees for these forms.

27. As an example, some of these documentation requirements can include a veterinary certificate of rabies vaccination issued within the preceding three years for cats and dogs over three months in age. For some other live animals and edible meat and meat products, a Zoosanitary Export Certificate or a veterinary certificate may be required. In other cases a permit to import will be required from the CFIA. Further requirements may include that the animal that is to be imported spend a specified period in the country of export prior to importation to Canada. In many cases, these animals and edible meat and meat products may be subject to inspection by the CFIA.

Confirmation of Sale/Invoice Requirements for Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

28. All commercial shipments of fresh fruits and vegetables must have a completed Confirmation of Sale (COS) document accompanying the shipment at time of release, except for Electronic Data Information (EDI) transactions where the COS data is already captured.

29. Any commercial shipment released through EDI does not require a completed COS document to accompany the shipment at time of release.

30. The COS document must be signed by the purchaser, vendor, importer or their respective representative.

31. The COS document must satisfy all the invoice requirements as outlined in Memorandum D1-4-1, CBSA Invoice Requirements.

32. In addition to satisfying CBSA invoice requirements, a copy of the COS document is required to be marked as "Copy for the Canadian Food Inspection Agency."

33. At time of release, border services officers must clearly apply the CBSA office date-stamp to each copy of the COS document. The date should be stamped carefully so as not to obscure information on the document. It may be applied to the back of the document if necessary.

34. The following CBSA offices are to send the completed COS documents on a daily basis, in accordance with arrangements made between those CBSA offices and the CFIA, to the addresses provided in the appendix: Lacolle, QC; Pearson International Airport, Toronto, ON; Niagara Falls, ON; Windsor Tunnel, ON; Windsor Bridge, ON; St-Stephen, NB; Woodstock, NB; Coutts, AB; Emerson, MB; Regway, SK; Pacific Hwy, BC.

35. All other CBSA offices are to send the completed COS documents on a weekly basis, in accordance with arrangements made between those CBSA offices and the CFIA, to the addresses provided in the appendix. Please note that in addition to the Confirmation of Sale/Invoice Requirements, other documentation related to the Plant Protection Act and its Regulations may be required. Please refer to AIRS for more information.

36. Questions concerning the COS document are to be directed to the CFIA’s National Import Service Centre, as listed above.

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)

37. In addition to the regulations and policies outlined in this memorandum, many species of plants and animals are subject to the requirements of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). Travellers and importers must ensure that any FPA and related products that they are bringing into Canada meet all CITES requirements.

38. To determine CITES import requirements refer to Memorandum D19-7-1, Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), or visit Environment Canada’s CITES Web site: http://ec.gc.ca/nature.

Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT)

39. In addition to the regulations and policies outlined in this memorandum, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (DFAIT) has set limits on the quantity and/or dollar value of certain food products that can be brought into Canada duty-free or that can be included in a traveller’s personal exemption. Without an import permit from DFAIT for quantities over and above the established limits, you will have to pay duty based on a rate determined by the value of the goods.

40. For more information on DFAIT quotas refer to Memorandum D19-10-2, Export and Import Permits Act (Importations) and Memorandum D10-18-1, Tariff Rate Quotas or visit the Export and Import Controls Bureau of DFAIT Canada at www.international.gc.ca/eicb.

Inadmissible Goods

41. Importers must ensure that their goods comply with the requirements of all government departments and agencies prior to importation into Canada.

42. When commercial shipments and travellers’ personal goods are not in compliance with the requirements and the requirements cannot be met, the goods will be either ordered removed from Canada or will be seized and disposed of in accordance with the legislation that controls, regulates or prohibits the importation of the commodity.

43. Importers may abandon the goods to the Crown, in accordance with subsections 36(1) and 36(2) of the Customs Act.

44. Importers are responsible for all reasonable expenses incurred in the disposal of abandoned goods.

45. Goods that are forfeited to another government department or agency remain the responsibility of that department.

In-Transit Shipments

46. For the purpose of this memorandum "in-transit" is defined as the movement of goods through Canada en route to their ultimate destination, e.g. goods originating in the United States moving through Canada to another destination in the United States.

47. The CBSA may authorize in-transit shipments of CFIA-regulated commodities only with the pre-approval of the CFIA under the following conditions:

  • (a) the goods must meet CBSA reporting requirements, and
  • (b) the goods must meet CFIA import requirements, and
  • (c) the goods must be transported by a bonded carrier.

Postal and Courier Importations

48. Goods that are imported through the postal or courier system must meet all import requirements.

49. Low value shipments are subject to all CFIA import requirements.

50. Additional information on postal and courier importations can be found in Memorandum D5-1-1, Canada Border Services Agency International Mail Processing System, and Memorandum D8-2-16, Courier Imports Remission Order.

Diplomatic Goods

51. All importations of FPA or related products are subject to CFIA import requirements, regardless of any diplomatic immunity or privilege extended to the person importing the goods.

52. For additional information refer to Memorandum D21-1-1, Customs Privileges for Diplomatic Missions, Consular Posts, and International Organizations (Tariff Item No. 9808.00.00).

Trade Fairs and Shows in Canada

53. Food and horticultural products imported for trade fairs, shows, and other special events in Canada are subject to all of the requirements outlined in AIRS.

Export Reporting Requirements

54. Several Acts of Parliament prohibit, control or regulate the exportation of some goods, including certain FPA goods, which are subject to CFIA export controls. Further information on the requirements of these Acts can be found in the D19 series of memoranda.

55. Food exports from Canada are subject to a certification process, which plays an important role in Canada’s international trade and helps to protect the excellent international reputation of Canada’s exports of food, plants, animals and associated products. Specific CFIA export requirements can be found on the CFIA’s Web site at www.inspection.gc.ca.

56. The CBSA’s export reporting requirements are outlined in Memorandum D20-1-1, Export Reporting. Specific information regarding reporting requirements under the new Reporting of Exported Goods Regulations can be found on the CBSA’s Web site at www.cbsa.gc.ca.

Administrative Monetary Penalty System (AMPS)

57. The AMPS is a system of administrative monetary penalties for failure to comply with legislative, regulatory, or program requirements. The AMPS will impose monetary penalties in proportion to the type, frequency, and severity of the infraction. AMPS is a flexible and cost-effective response to violations that do not warrant costly and lengthy court prosecution procedures but are serious enough to pose a risk to our country.

58. For additional information refer to Memorandum D22-1-1, Administrative Monetary Penalty System.

59. The CBSA also has the authority to issue administrative warnings and monetary penalties under the authority of the Agriculture and Agri-food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act (AA-AMPS) and Regulations to travellers who fail to declare verbally or in writing regulated FPA goods that can pose a threat to the Canadian economy, environment and to the health and safety of Canadians.

60. For additional information refer to the Info Kit for Brokers on the CFIA’s Web site at www.inspection.gc.ca.

Additional Information

61. For additional information, visit the Border Information Service (BIS) online at www.cbsa.gc.ca, or call BIS toll-free in Canada at 1-800-461-9999. If you are calling from outside Canada, you can access BIS by calling 204-983-3500 or 506-636-5064 (long-distance charges will apply). BIS agents are available, during regular business hours from Monday to Friday (except holidays), 8:00 to 16:00 local time. TTY is also available within Canada: 1-866-335-3237.

62. Any questions concerning this memorandum should be directed to:

Food, Plant and Animal Unit
Canada Border Services Agency
150 Isabella Street
Ottawa ON K1A 0L8

Appendix

Mailing Addresses for Confirmation of Sale

For ports of entry: British Columbia Coastal

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Specialist
Suite 400, 4321 Still Creek Drive
Burnaby BC V5C 6S7

Telephone: 604-666-7778
Facsimile: 604-666-1963

For ports of entry: British Columbia, including Kingsgate and Osoyoos

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Multi-Program Inspector
34577 91 Street
P.O. Box 1530
Oliver BC V0H 1T0

Telephone: 250-498-5301
Facsimile: 250-498-5303

For ports of entry: Saskatchewan and Manitoba

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Specialist
Room 613, 269 Main Street
Winnipeg MB R3C 1B2

Telephone: 204-984-6186
Facsimile: 204-983-8022

For ports of entry: Quebec

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Specialist
7101 Jean Talon Street East, Room 600
Anjou QC H1M 3N7

Telephone: 514-493-8859
Facsimile: 514-493-6306

For ports of entry: Alberta

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Specialist
1115, 57 Avenue North East
Calgary AB T2E 9B2

Telephone: 403-292-6746
Facsimile: 403-292-6629

For ports of entry: Ontario

For ports of entry: Essex county including the city of Windsor:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Agri-Food Programs
174 Stone Road West
Guelph ON N1G 4S9

Telephone: 519-826-2889
Facsimile: 519-837-9772

For ports of entry: All Other Locations:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program
1050 Courtenay Park Drive East
Mississauga ON L5T 2R4

Telephone: 905-795-1272
Facsimile: 905-795-2593

For ports of entry: Atlantic

Canadian Food Inspection Agency
Import Coordinator
1081 Main Street, P.O. Box 6088
Moncton NB E1C 8R2

Telephone: 506-851-3015
Facsimile: 506-851-2801

References

Issuing office Food, Plant and Animal Unit
Border Programs Directorate
Programs Branch
Canada Border Services Agency
Headquarters file

7616, 4617-4

Legislative references Canada Border Services Agency Act
Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Customs Act
Health of Animals Act
Plant Protection Act
Other references D1-4-1, D3 series, D5-1-1, D8-2-16, D10-18-1, D10-18-6, D, D19-7-1, D19-8-2, D19-9-1, D19-10-2, D19-10-3, D19-12-1, D19-12-2, D20-1-0, D20-1-1, D21-1-1
Superseded memoranda D

D19-1-1, September 20, 2006