Marine Pre-load/Pre-arrival and Reporting Requirements

Memorandum D3-5-1

ISSN 2369-2391

Ottawa, August 4, 2015

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In Brief

This memorandum has been revised to:

  • (a) Include pre-load/pre-arrival, arrival and post arrival processes of cargo and conveyance for goods being imported or transiting through Canada via the marine mode, cancelling Memoranda D3-5-2 and D12-1-1.
  • (b) Denote the Directorate, Division and Unit names current appellations.

This memorandum outlines and explains specific Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) requirements and procedures for reporting and controlling cargo imported by marine carriers.

This memorandum does not outline the policies and procedures for the reporting of goods under the Customs Self-Assessment (CSA) Program; consolidated cargo reporting requirements and process for freight forwarders; goods whether commercial or personal transported by an individual who does not meet the criteria for designation as a carrier or goods being exported from Canada; coasting trade licences, outward reporting and release of commercial goods, or Other Government Departments (OGD) requirements pertaining to the commercial importation/in-transit movements of regulated goods. For information on the Customs Self-Assessment (CSA) Program policies, guidelines and procedures; refer to Memorandum D3-1-7, Customs Self Assessment Program for Carriers. For information on freight forwarder reporting processes, refer to Memorandum D3-3-1, Forwarded and Consolidated Cargo – Import Movements. For information on coasting trade license, refer to Memorandum D3-5-7, Temporary Importation of Vessels. For information about the reporting and transportation of goods being exported from Canada refer to Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements. For information on the release of commercial goods, please refer to Memorandum D17-1-4, Release of Commercial Goods. OGD requirements can be found throughout the D Memoranda series.


Guidelines and General Information

Definitions

1. The following definitions apply to this memorandum:

ACI
Advance Commercial Information
AMPS
Administrative Monetary Penalty System
Break-bulk goods
Commercial goods that are neither transported within a cargo container nor in bulk (e.g. grain stowed loosely in the vessel’s hold) and include goods such as oil and gas equipment, construction equipment, and automobiles.
Bulk goods
Goods that are loose or in mass, such that they are confined only by the permanent structures of the vessel, without intermediate containment or intermediate packaging.
CACM
Conveyance Arrival Certification Message
Cargo
A term used to describe a collection of goods or shipment. It consists of a grouping of related goods. The cargo is detailed on the waybill, the manifest or a Cargo Control Document.
Cargo Control Document (CCD)
A manifest or other control document that acts as the record of a shipment entering or exiting Canada e.g. A6A, Freight/Cargo Manifest.
Cargo Control Number (CCN)
The Cargo Control Number is a number assigned to a transport document. It uniquely identifies cargo detailed on a cargo submission. The Cargo Control Number consists of the carrier code followed by a unique reference number assigned by the carrier/representative and cannot contain spaces.
  • (a) 1st 4 characters = CBSA approved carrier code
  • (b) Remaining characters = carrier/representative assigned reference number.
Cargo transmission
A cargo transmission is the package of cargo data that is transmitted. It is comprised of a CCN for each shipment on the conveyance along with the corresponding cargo data, and the CRN corresponding to the conveyance the cargo is being transported on.
Carrier
For the purpose of assessing carrier code eligibility, the CBSA defines a carrier as the entity operating a conveyance transporting specified goods to Canada. To operate a conveyance means to have legal custody and control of the conveyance as:
  • (a) an owner;
  • (b) a lessee under a lease or agreement of hire;
  • (c) a charterer under an agreement of hire;
  • (d) as a purchaser under a conditional sale or hire purchase agreement that reserves to the vendor the title to the conveyance until the purchase price is paid or certain conditions are performed; or
  • (e) a mortgagor.
Carrier code
As stated in the Customs Act, means the unique identification number issued by the Minister either under subsection 12.1(4) or before the coming into force of that subsection.
Clearance
Is the official customs permission to enter/leave and sail.
Client
Anyone who:
  • (a) Sends to the CBSA a collection of information; or
  • (b) Receives notices from the CBSA
Commercial goods
Goods that are or will be imported for sale or for any commercial, industrial, occupational, institutional or other similar use.
Consignee
The definition of consignee is to be understood as follow given the applicable context:
  • (a) The consignee definition to be used by carriers when transmitting electronic pre-load/pre-arrival data: the name and address of the party to which the cargo/goods are being shipped to as shown on carrier’s contract of carriage (For example: Bill of Lading, Air Waybill or other shipping document).
  • (b) The consignee definition used with respect to freight forwarders who are providing the CBSA with detailed information pertaining to a consolidated shipment will be: the name and address of the party to which the cargo/goods are being “shipped to” as shown on carrier’s contract of carriage (For example: Bill of Lading, Air Waybill, or other shipping document).
  • (c) The consignee definition used with respect to freight forwarders who are providing the CBSA with detailed information pertaining to a deconsolidated shipment will be: the name and address of the party to which the goods are being “shipped to” as shown on the commercial sales contract (For example: commercial invoice, bill of sale, or other sales contract).
  • Note: The freight forwarder is limited to the information they have on hand at the time of the transmission. The consignee may change more than one time throughout a voyage to Canada. The freight forwarder will provide updates to the transmission as they receive updated information.
  • Example: For business or legal reasons goods are consigned to a bank (foreign or Canadian domestic) or “to order” of a bank. In this case, the consignee field of the house bill transmitted by the freight forwarder will reflect the party to whom the goods are legally consigned at the time of transmission (the bank). If the goods are sold while en route, and/or if the bank chooses to endorse the goods to a third party (as per the “to order”) or if the consignee information otherwise changes; the freight forwarder will submit an electronic update to the house bill data as soon as they become aware of the change, updating the consignee field.
Consolidation
A number of separate shipments grouped together by a consolidator or freight forwarder and shipped to an agent or a freight forwarder as one shipment under one bill of lading and reported to the CBSA on one cargo control document.
Consortium
A group of carriers formed to undertake a partnership beyond the resources of any one member.
Conveyance
Taken from Customs Act ss. 2(1) - Any vehicle, aircraft or water-borne craft or any other contrivance that is used to move persons or goods.
Conveyance operating carrier
The carrier company operating the conveyance transporting goods to Canada that is ultimately responsible for reporting the conveyance and cargo as required under the Customs Act. This is true whether the carrier company owns the conveyance outright, leases the conveyance, or whether any type of security interest is registered on the conveyance.
Conveyance Reference Number (CRN)
A unique reference number assigned by the carrier to identify a particular voyage for a particular conveyance.
Conveyance transmission
The package of conveyance data that is transmitted. It is comprised of the conveyance reference number (CRN) along with the corresponding conveyance data, as well as a cargo control number for each shipment on the conveyance.
CSA
Customs Self-Assessment
ECCRD
Electronic Commerce Client Requirements Document
EDI - Electronic Data Interchange
Systems allow clients to electronically transmit their import or export data, as well as their accounting documents, to the CBSA. These systems facilitate the CBSA’s ability to quickly process low-risk goods, focusing resources on identifying potential threats to Canada’s safety and security. EDI is a set of standards for structuring information to be electronically exchanged between and within businesses, organizations, government entities and other groups. These standards prescribe the formats, character sets, and data elements used in the exchange of business documents and forms. The term EDI is also used to refer to the implementation and operation of systems and processes for creating, transmitting, and receiving EDI documents.
Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) Marine
Generally used in the context of ‘pre-arrival’ for the purpose of knowing the approximate time that a vessel will arrive at a dock in Canada.
Ferries
Vessels, scows, barges, and similar craft whether self-propelled or towed, used solely or principally for the transportation of vehicles and passengers across international waters shall be classified as ferries.
First Canadian Port of Arrival (FPOA)
The first Canadian port that a vessel stops for any reason including but not limited to the loading and or discharging of cargo, anchoring, bunkering, safety inspections, crew changes, diversions, etc.
Freight forwarder
A person who, on behalf of one or more owners, importers, shippers or consignees of goods, causes specified goods to be transported by one or more carriers.
Freight Remaining on Board (FROB)
Cargo on a vessel that is not being discharged at a Canadian seaport.
Hand-carried goods
Goods that will be released after they have been accounted for and all duties with respect to them have been paid under subsection 32(1) of the Act if
  • (a) the goods are or will be in the actual possession of a person arriving in Canada; or
  • (b) the goods form or will form part of a person’s baggage and the person and the baggage arrive or will arrive in Canada on board the same conveyance.
In-transit (Marine)
The movement of a conveyance/goods through Canada to another country without disposing of goods or people. This includes transshipment of goods arriving by ship in Canada and transferring to another ship departing Canada.
Inward documentation
The formal inward report entry verifies that all the primary CBSA and OGD formalities have been executed. The A6, General Declarationor the Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) A6 Conveyance Reports are part of the required “documents” to be reviewed during the formal entry. If there is cargo on board the vessel, The A6A, Freight/Cargo Manifest declarations or the EDI A6A Prime Cargo Reports will also be required.
OGD
Other Government Departments - Federal Departments or Agencies such as: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) or Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD) etc.
PARS - Pre-Arrival Review System
A line release option allowing importers and brokers to present release documents prior to the arrival of a shipment in order to obtain release upon arrival.
Port of report
The port where marine cargo physically crosses into Canada at the FPOA. The port of arrival of all cargo on board a conveyance should match the port of report.
Pre-arrival
Prior to a conveyance or goods arriving in Canada.
Pre-arrival information
Data pertaining to the importation of goods that is sent to CBSA in advance of the actual arrival.
Pre-load
Prior to a conveyance being loaded with cargo destined for Canada. Data pertaining to the importation of goods that is sent to the CBSA in advance of the goods being laden on the conveyance. Applies to the marine mode only and means prior to loading the cargo at a foreign port.
Record
Any material on which data are recorded or marked and which is capable of being read or understood by a person or a computer system or other device.
Release Notification System (RNS)
A system message sent to the client regarding the status of cargo.
Re-manifest
New cargo control document with a new cargo control number, that is presented to change a cargo control document that had previously been submitted to the CBSA. Re-manifests are generally presented to change destination office or carrier code.
Shipment
  • (a) A shipment for which a carrier is responsible is one that consists of
    • (i) a specified good or collection of specified goods that is listed in a single bill of lading, waybill or other similar document that is issued by the carrier and that relates to the carriage of those goods, or
    • (ii) a specified good that is an empty cargo container that is not for sale that is transported by the carrier but that is not listed in a bill of lading, waybill or other similar document; and
  • (b) A shipment for which a freight forwarder is responsible is one that consists of a specified good or collection of specified goods that is listed in a single bill of lading, waybill or other similar document that is issued by the freight forwarder and that relates to the carriage of those goods.
Supplementary Cargo Report (SCR)
A set of data elements transmitted by a carrier or freight forwarder client to complete a cargo report. It is used to complete an electronic Advance Commercial Information (ACI) cargo report in Air and Marine modes. Data elements include detailed cargo information that is not available on the original cargo report (i.e. ultimate consignee, precise description, and shipper information).
Supplementary Reference Number (SRN)
Reference number assigned by the freight forwarder or carrier or the carrier’s agent to identify the Supplementary Cargo Transmission.
Specified goods
(under the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations) – Commercial goods, goods that are or will be imported to Canada for a fee and empty cargo containers that are not for sale but does not include:
  • (a) goods that will be released after they have been accounted for and all duties with respect to them have been paid under subsection 32(1) of the Act if
    • (i) the goods are or will be in the actual possession of a person arriving in Canada, or
    • (ii) the goods form or will form part of a person’s baggage and the person and the baggage arrive or will arrive in Canada on board the same conveyance;
  • (b) mail;
  • (c) commercial goods that are used in a repair that is made outside Canada to a conveyance that was built in Canada or in respect of which duties have been paid, if the repair is made as a result of an unforeseen contingency that occurs outside Canada and is necessary to ensure the conveyance’s safe return to Canada;
  • (d) a military conveyance within the meaning of subsection 18(1) of the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act or goods that are transported on board that conveyance;
  • (e) an emergency conveyance or goods that are transported on board that conveyance; or
  • (f) a conveyance that returns to Canada immediately after being denied entry to the United States or goods that are transported on board that conveyance.

General Information

2. The Customs Act, the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations and the Transportation of Goods Regulations, establish the time, manner and who is required to send pre-load/pre-arrival data pertaining to commercial cargo [for import, in-transit, and freight remaining on board (FROB)] and conveyances; entering or moving in-transit through Canada. To obtain a copy of the regulations, please see the Department of Justice’s Web site.

3. The receipt of pre-load/pre-arrival cargo and conveyance data enables the CBSA to:

  • (a) more effectively manage higher risk goods and identify threats to health, safety, and security prior to the arrival of cargo and conveyances in Canada;
  • (b) allow lower risk goods a more efficient, stream-lined process at the border; and
  • (c) control the movement of in bond goods.

4. Except as otherwise prescribed in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations and the Transportation of Goods Regulations, all goods that are imported, moving in-transit through Canada, or freight remaining on board (FROB) must be reported to the CBSA at the first port of arrival (FPOA) in Canada, even when exempt from the requirement to provide Advance Commercial Information (ACI). The requirement to report goods to the CBSA is effected electronically, orally or in writing in the prescribed manner as described in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations. This also applies to conveyances that are exempt from the ACI requirements.

Liability

5. All carriers transporting specified goods into Canada must electronically transmit to the CBSA specified data pertaining to the cargo and conveyance within the prescribed timeframes as described in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations. Provision of this data and within prescribed timeframes satisfies the requirement set out in Section 12.1 of the Customs Act.

6. Transmission of electronic pre-arrival conveyance/cargo data does not constitute “reporting” for the purposes of Section 12(1) of the Customs Act. Report, as defined in Section 12(1) is not achieved until the conveyance has arrived in Canada and a report is made to the CBSA at the FPOA by way of the Conveyance Arrival Certification Message (CACM).

7. As per Section 7.1 of the Customs Act, carriers are liable to ensure all information provided to the CBSA including pre-load/pre-arrival and arrival information is true, accurate, and complete. Furthermore, as per Section 22 of the Customs Act and Section 7 of the Transportation of Goods Regulations, the information transmitted must be supported by source documentation (i.e. bills of lading, invoices, contract of carriage) and made available to the CBSA upon request.

8. As per the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations, the operator of a conveyance that transports specified goods to Canada is solely liable for providing all cargo and conveyance pre-load/pre-arrival and arrival information by electronic means, in accordance with the technical requirements, specifications and procedures that are set out in Chapter 1: Advance Commercial Information (ACI) Marine Electronic Commerce Client Requirements Document (ECCRD).

9. The operator of a conveyance (hereafter known as the “conveyance operating carrier”) is ultimately responsible for the conveyance and the cargo on board. It is their carrier code that must be quoted in the Conveyance Reference Number (CRN) when transmitting conveyance data to the CBSA. Where business arrangements exist, another carrier may provide the pre-load/pre-arrival data to the CBSA; however, it is the conveyance operating carrier that remains liable for pre-load/pre-arrival cargo and conveyance and arrival information requirements in accordance with Section 12.1 of the Customs Act.

10. The carrier whose carrier code is on the cargo transmission is liable for duties and taxes for the goods until released by the CBSA, or liability is transferred in accordance with Section 20(2) of the Customs Act.

11. Carriers may hire a service provider or agent to transmit pre-load/pre-arrival cargo and/or conveyance and arrival information on their behalf. The carrier code on the electronic transmission must be that of the actual carrier, not the agent or service provider(s). In order for the CBSA to communicate with the agent or service provider on behalf of the carrier, a third party consent must be completed and on file with the Agency. Consult EDI Systems’ Web page.

Record Keeping

12. In addition to records required to be maintained for other program areas, every person who transports or causes goods to be transported into or within Canada is required, under the Transportation of Goods Regulations, to keep records of the electronic data that has been transmitted to the CBSA and any acknowledgment of receipt of that data received from the CBSA. Furthermore, the records that must be kept include all source documents specifically related to the individual data elements transmitted and information reported at time of arrival.

13. For CBSA purposes, records related to the conveyance and cargo transmission and report upon arrival must be kept for a period of three years commencing on the 1st day of January of the calendar year following the calendar year during which the cargo/conveyance referenced in the records were transported.

Monitoring

14. In addition to all other monitoring and verification activities, the CBSA will perform periodic monitoring of the records kept by carriers related to electronic conveyance and cargo information. The monitoring will confirm whether the conveyance and cargo data was submitted in a timely manner and that information transmitted pre-load/pre-arrival is true, accurate and complete and corresponds to the information contained on the source documents on file.

Carrier Identification Requirement

15. Any carrier transporting or causing specified goods to be transported into Canada must have a CBSA assigned carrier code.

16. Freight forwarders must have a CBSA assigned carrier code in order to transmit pre-load/pre-arrival information. Marine carriers preforming the duties of a freight forwarder as defined in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations, and transmitting pre-arrival supplementary or house bill data must also have a CBSA assigned carrier code.

17. The CBSA carrier code forms the prefix of the Cargo Control Number (CCN), the Conveyance Reference Number (CRN) and the Supplementary Reference Number (SRN).

18. For the purpose of identifying carriers and freight forwarders a bonded or non-bonded CBSA carrier code will be assigned to a company upon authorization. This carrier code must be shown on all cargo control documents presented or transmitted to the CBSA.

19. CRN’s must have the CBSA assigned carrier code of the legal entity (carrier) physically arriving at the border.

20. For information pertaining to carrier code requirements and how to obtain a carrier code, please refer to Memorandum D3-1-1, Policy Respecting the Importation and Transportation of Goods.

Security Requirements

21. A carrier or a Canadian freight forwarder desiring to become bonded under general authorization must complete an application and file security in a format as outlined in CBSA forms.

22. To become a bonded carrier or freight forwarder security must be filed in accordance with Memorandum D3-1-1, Policy Respecting the Importation and Transportation of Goods.

Cargo and Conveyance Transmission Timeframes

23. Carriers (or an authorized third-party provider acting on the carrier’s behalf), are required to prepare and transmit the required cargo, supplementary cargo (if applicable) and conveyance information within the timeframes specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

24. Timeframes for transmissions are based on the type of cargo and routing. Please see Appendix A for a complete list of timeframes.

25. For exemptions from cargo and conveyance requirements refer to the ACI Exemptions section of this document, starting at paragraph 102.

26. Cargo and conveyance data may be transmitted up to 30 days in advance. The CBSA encourages clients to transmit pre-load/pre-arrival data as early as possible.

Cargo Control Number and Conveyance Reference Number Reuse Timeframes

27. Marine CCN’s, CRN’s and SRN’s must be unique and cannot be reused for three years starting January 1st of the year following its initial use.

Electronic Communication with the CBSA

28. Carriers must transmit data using the CBSA’s electronic data interchange (EDI) systems. Before initiating the application process, (outlined below) carriers/freight forwarders must have a valid CBSA assigned carrier code, as per Section 12.1 of the Customs Act.

Application to Transmit Electronic Data to the CBSA

29. Carriers using EDI are required to complete an application form and submit it to the Technical Commercial Client Unit (TCCU).

30. EDI clients may choose to transmit their own data to the CBSA or they may choose to use a service provider. For more information on how to apply to participate in EDI, methods of electronic communication and general information on EDI refer to the CBSA Web site.

31. For all enquiries related to any problems with electronic transmission of data and the related application process, or to obtain a copy of Chapter 1: ACI Marine ECCRD, please contact the Technical Commercial Client Unit at:

Technical Commercial Client Unit
Canada Border Services Agency
355 North River Road, 6th floor, Tower B
Ottawa ON K1A 0L8
Phone: 1-888-957-7224 (Option 1) calls within Canada and the U.S.; 1-613-946-0762 for overseas callers
Email: tccu-ustcc@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

Transmitting Accurate Data

32. When using Pre-Arrival Review System (PARS), the electronically transmitted CCN on the cargo data must exactly match the CCN quoted in the PARS release request, inclusive of the acronym “PARS”, where applicable.

33. It is not a requirement to embed the letters “PARS” into a PARS number, but if a carrier does embed letters into the PARS number, then the carrier must use the identical number in their pre-load/pre-arrival cargo transmission.

34. If the CCN quoted in the PARS release does not exactly match the electronically transmitted cargo data, this will affect the Release Notification System (RNS) capabilities and subscribers will not receive RNS messages. Inaccurate CCN transmissions by carriers/freight forwarders could result in sanctions for non-compliance including the issuing of Administrative Monetary Penalties (AMPS). Release may also be negatively affected.

35. The Supplementary Reference Number (SRN) transmitted on the supplementary cargo report must be different and unique when compared to the CCN used for secondary cargo control document(s).

First Port of Arrival (FPOA)

36. The FPOA must be transmitted on all cargo and conveyance transmissions.

37. FPOA is the first Canadian port at which a vessel stops for any reason, including but not limited to the loading and/or discharging of cargo, bunkering, safety inspections, crew changes, diversions, etc.

38. For a list of designated CBSA offices, please refer to the CBSA Web site.

Great Lakes Requirements

39. For vessels travelling into, and through Canada from off shore with foreign loaded cargo and up bound, Montréal will be the FPOA, unless the vessel stopped somewhere else in Canada first. The captain must be prepared to stop for examination if required.

40. For vessels travelling with foreign loaded cargo from the Great Lakes, the first place the vessel stops is the FPOA. If the vessel is passing through the Welland Canal, Port Colborne will be the FPOA, unless the vessel stopped somewhere else in Canada first. The captain must be prepared to stop for examination, if required.

Data Transmission Guidelines

Primary Cargo Data

41. The primary cargo data must be electronically transmitted to the CBSA by the carrier or a service provider authorized by that carrier to transmit on their behalf, within the prescribed timeframes as outlined in Appendix A. A marine cargo transmission is mandatory for all non-exempt import, in-transit, or FROB cargo.

42. If primary cargo data must be transmitted prior to loading, the Estimated Date/Time of Loading (EDTL) must be indicated on the cargo transmission. The transmission time must be at least 24 hours prior to the EDTL.

43. A complete list of the information that a marine carrier must include in the primary cargo transmission can be found in Chapter 1: ACI Marine ECCRD.

Supplementary Cargo and House Bill Data

44. The supplementary cargo data must be electronically transmitted to the CBSA by the freight forwarder or their authorized service provider, within the prescribed timeframes as specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations supplementary cargo transmission is mandatory for all non-exempt FROB cargo.

45. The house bill data must be electronically transmitted to the CBSA by the freight forwarder or their authorized service provider, within the prescribed timeframes as specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations. The house bill transmission is mandatory for all non-exempt consolidated import, in bond, and in-transit shipments.

Empty Cargo Container Data

46. Marine empty cargo container data must be transmitted to the CBSA by the conveyance operating carrier or a service provider authorized by that carrier to transmit on their behalf, within the prescribed timeframes as outlined in Appendix A.

47. Marine empty cargo container transmission(s) are mandatory for all non-exempt import, in-transit, or FROB containers.

48. For a complete list of the information that a marine carrier must include in the marine empty cargo container transmission and information regarding empty cargo containers in international shuttle service refer to Chapter 1: ACI Marine ECCRD.

Company Seals Applied Prior to Arrival at FPOA

49. If a container, equipment, or part thereof that contains in bond goods is sealed with a company seal, the seal number must be noted correctly on the pre-load/pre-arrival cargo transmission. The company seal will remain intact, unless the CBSA performs an examination.

Conveyance Data

50. The conveyance operating carrier or the carrier’s authorized service provider must prepare and transmit an electronic transmission to the CBSA with the required conveyance data within the prescribed time frames specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations and as outlined in Appendix A.

51. There are some exemptions to this requirement and these are listed the exemptions section of this memorandum, starting at paragraph 102.

52. Only one conveyance report transmission is to be submitted per vessel, voyage/trip. In the case of consortium arrangements, the conveyance operating carrier or a service provider authorized by that carrier is responsible for providing electronic conveyance data for the vessel.

53. The Estimated Date and Time of Arrival (EDTA) data element must be kept accurate to within eight hours. If the EDTA is expected to differ by more than eight hours, a change must be sent electronically with an updated EDTA. An updated EDTA is also required if the vessel is expected to arrive on a new calendar day, regardless of whether it is within 8 hour timeframe.

54. If due to port congestion, a vessel must wait in anchorage for a spot at the dock, the vessel is considered arrived, and the EDTA does not have to be updated.

55. Cargo can be discharged upon arrival, prior to the EDTA, as long as it meets all the following criteria:

  • (a) Within the eight (8) hour timeframe;
  • (b) The CACM has been transmitted;
  • (c) CBSA system has updated the status of the conveyance and related cargo; and,
  • (d) CBSA acknowledges the report of the conveyance and cargo with a Section 12(1) report message to the originator of the CACM.

56. The cargo cannot be discharged if a “Do not unload” message has been issued by the CBSA.

57. A complete list of the information that must be included in the conveyance data can be found in Chapter 1: ACI Marine ECCRD.

Conveyance Arrival Certification Message (CACM)

58. To meet the reporting requirements under section 12(1) of the Customs Act, the conveyance operating carrier must transmit an EDI CACM upon arrival at the FPOA.

59. The CACM is required in addition to the cargo and conveyance Advance Commercial Information (ACI) previously transmitted according to the prescribed timeframes as described in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

60. Conveyances exempt from transmitting ACI data to the CBSA are, therefore, exempt from transmitting the CACM. Exempt conveyances must be reported to the CBSA at the FPOA, under section 12(1) of the Customs Act, in the same manner as they are today. However, if a marine carrier (conveyance operator) choses to voluntarily transmit an electronic ACI conveyance report (Electronic A6) for a vessel with an ACI exemption, the CACM must be transmitted in order for the arrival status in the CBSA system to be finalized. For example, if a carrier’s common practice is to still transmit an Electronic A6 for an in ballast vessel, they must also transmit the CACM. For report on arrival requirements under Section 12(1) of the Customs Act, including exempt conveyance, refer to the Vessel Clearance Requirements – General section of this document.

61. The arrival process, triggered by the CACM, replaces the arrival process that is based on the EDTA provided by clients as part of the advance conveyance data set.

62. The conveyance operating carrier, or a service provider authorized by that carrier to transmit on their behalf, prepares and transmits a CACM to the CBSA through EDI.

63. An arrival in the marine mode is defined as when the marine vessel lands at a CBSA office following arrival in Canada. The marine vessel will meet the definition of landing when it first comes to rest in Canada; whether at anchor, at dock or berthed alongside at the nearest CBSA office designated for that purpose. The CACM must be transmitted and received within a two (2) hour window, allowing marine carriers to transmit their arrival request up to two hours in advance of their actual arrival at a Canadian port. This two-hour window is conditional on the vessel being within Canadian waters at the time the arrival request is submitted to the CBSA. Furthermore, the actual time of arrival transmitted on the CACM must be the actual time the message is transmitted.

64. Upon receipt, validation and acceptance of the CACM, the CBSA system updates the status of the conveyance and related cargo, and acknowledges the arrival of the conveyance with a Section 12(1) “Reported Notice” to the originator of the arrival message. This notice indicates the carrier operating the conveyance (as identified by the CBSA carrier code transmitted within the conveyance report) has met their obligation to report under Section 12(1) of the Customs Act for the conveyance and all shipments detailed on cargo documents that are linked to that conveyance. The CACM will generate any release (for shipments requesting FPOA release)/referral notification messages accordingly. Please refer to the Advance Commercial Information (ACI)/eManifest Non-highway Conveyance Arrival Certification Message Implementation Guide for more information.

65. All Section 12(1) “Reported Notices” sent to the carrier must be kept on file and made available to the CBSA when requested during compliance monitoring, supported by the requirements in the Transportation of Goods Regulations.

66. For a complete list of the information that must be included in the Conveyance Arrival Certification Message, please refer to the Advance Commercial Information (ACI)/eManifest Non-highway Conveyance Arrival Certification Message Implementation Guide. For a copy of this guide, please contact the Technical Commercial Client Unit at:

Technical Commercial Client Unit
Canada Border Services Agency
355 North River Road, 6th floor, Tower B
Ottawa ON K1A 0L8
Phone: 1-888-957-7224 (Option 1) calls within Canada and the U.S.; 1-613-946-0762 for overseas callers.
Email: tccu-ustcc@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

Marine Bay Plan (Vessel Stow Plan)

67. The marine bay plan is a standard marine transportation document that assigns a numbered position to all cargo bays on the vessel and details the exact location of each container being transported on board the vessel. It is used by persons in the marine transportation industry to identify all the containers and their location on a vessel. Information about each container and its specific location is electronically logged as the vessel is loaded and unloaded at a port, ultimately resulting in a “blueprint” of the cargo and other stowage locations.

68. Marine carriers are required to provide the vessel bay or stow plan to the CBSA electronically within 48 hours after the vessel leaves the last foreign port before its estimated arrival at a port of arrival in Canada. This information enables the CBSA to identify unreported containers and pinpoint containers which may pose risk. Cargo information provided by the carrier for goods expected to be transported to Canada before the goods are loaded onto the vessel will be compared to bay plan data provided after the containers are loaded aboard the vessel.

69. For more information on Marine Bay Plan, please see Chapter 6: ACI Bay Plan.

Notification and Error Messages

70. All pre-load/pre-arrival data received will be validated and processed through CBSA’s systems, and the CBSA will transmit response messages back to the sender. Notices are sent to the sender via the same route as the incoming transmission.

71. There are two types of response messages clients can expect to receive from CBSA systems when submitting pre-load/pre-arrival transmissions by electronic means:

  • (a) Positive Responses
  • (b) Error Responses

72. Positive responses are issued in the form of Acknowledgements. Acknowledgements are generated when the EDI transmission has successfully passed all syntactical, conformance and validation edits.

73. An error code will be transmitted to the sender indicating the nature of the error, by way of a reject notice. Carriers and freight forwarders must make changes to transmissions in error and re-send to the CBSA in a timely manner. The rejected report will be considered by the CBSA as non-transmission of the conveyance and/or cargo data until the identified errors have been addressed and the data is in accepted status by CBSA system.

74. For a complete description of all notifications, error messages and codes and their application, as well as request for information notices refer to the Electronic Commerce section or Chapter 1: ACI Marine ECCRD.

Manifest Forward

75. For consolidated shipments, freight forwarders are able to nominate their primary carrier as a secondary notify party, enabling the carrier to view house bill data.

76. For more information on Manifest Forward refer to Chapter 11 – ACI eManifest Notices ECCRD.

Risk Assessment Notices

77. Risk assessment notices may be issued when the CBSA requires the client to provide more information regarding the cargo or, to provide the client with specific instructions regarding the loading/unloading of the cargo.

78. Similar to reject notices (or error codes), risk assessment notices (such as ‘do not load’ notices) will include a coded field identifying the reason the notice was issued and the specific data element requiring clarification or further explanation. In addition, risk assessment notices may also include a free text remarks field providing external clients with additional information concerning the coded field or instructions.

79. CBSA systems will send “Do not load”, “Hold”, “Do not unload” and/or “Cancellation” coded messages back to the sender and other relevant parties. The message is sent out to the party(ies) via the same electronic means as the incoming transmission. These messages will reference the CCN, SRN and/or container numbers where applicable.

80. In cases where the cargo is loaded off-shore (non-U.S.) the CBSA has up until the EDTL to review the submitted primary cargo data and applicable house bill or supplementary cargo transmission(s). If the carrier does not receive a risk assessment notice (coded message), the cargo may be loaded at or after the EDTL.

81. If a risk assessment notice is received prior to the EDTL, the goods may not be authorized to be loaded on the vessel. The carrier must retransmit the primary cargo data with the required information and may not load the cargo until they have received an electronic cancellation coded message from the CBSA indicating that the risk assessment notice has been removed.

82. At any point while a vessel is traveling to Canada, a risk assessment notice (coded message) may be issued. This means that the cargo cannot be removed from the dock at the port of unloading until an electronic cancellation coded message indicating that the risk assessment notice has been removed by the CBSA.

83. As long as the cargo transmission has not been released/acquitted, the information requested by the CBSA in the ‘Hold’ message must be sent electronically. The CBSA will not accept faxes from brokers, carriers, freight forwarders or their agents.

84. If there is a “Hold” on a cargo that has been released/acquitted, the “Hold” supersedes the release/acquittal and the cargo cannot be removed from the dock until the “Hold” is removed by the CBSA. Because the cargo has been released/acquitted, the CBSA system will not accept electronic changes. Only a form BSF673, House Bill, Cargo and Conveyance Manual Correction Request Form – Post Arrival – All Modes including the changes will be accepted and must be sent by fax to the local CBSA office.

85. A Hold message may be issued subsequent to the lading of the cargo on the vessel in the foreign port where:

  • (a) CBSA requires information pertaining to the cargo such as delivery address or notify party. In this case, the carrier re-transmits the required data to CBSA using the EDI change function.
  • (b) CBSA may require an examination of the cargo upon arrival. In cases (a) and (b), the cargo may be unloaded from the vessel in Canada but is not authorized to move until permission is granted by CBSA in the form of a Hold Cancellation message.

86. If the importer/broker has already sent in a release/acquittal of the cargo which switches the status of the cargo to “Acquitted” when the vessel arrives and the CACM is transmitted, the cargo will not be released for delivery if there is still a “Hold” on the cargo in the system. Once the issue for which the ‘Hold’ was applied is resolved and the “Hold” is cancelled in the CBSA system, then the cargo will be released and can be removed from the dock.

87. Carriers may unload their cargo before the Estimated Date and Time of Arrival (EDTA), once the vessel clearance has been provided by the CBSA as long as it is within 8 hours of the EDTA. The cargo must remain on the dock until the EDTA, for possible examination, as a ‘Hold’ message may still be issued up until the EDTA or for as long as the goods remain within the terminals control.

88. It is the carrier’s responsibility to check their system for coded messages.

89. Calls relating to risk assessment notices (e.g. Hold, Do Not Load, Do Not Unload) should be made to the National Targeting Centre (NTC) at:

Telephone: 1-855-NTC-1CNC (1-855-682-1262) (24 hours a day, 7 days a week)
Overseas callers
Telephone: 1-613-941-0004 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week)
Email: nrac-aci@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca (marine only)

90. For a complete description of all notifications, error messages and codes and their application, as well as risk assessment notices, refer to the Electronic Commerce section or Chapter 1: ACI Marine ECCRD.

Corrections

Corrections to Cargo and/or Conveyance Data

91. Changes to cargo and/or conveyance data shall be made as soon as they are known.

92. Changes/corrections to conveyance data may be made electronically at any time prior to the arrival of the vessel at the FPOA.

Add/Change/Delete (Cancel)

93. An “Add” is used for the first submission (original) of any data, whether it is cargo or conveyance data. It must be transmitted within the timeframes as prescribed in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

94. A “Change” involves the pre-load/pre-arrival re-transmission of the entire record (all applicable data elements), which will then replace the entire record on file. As a rule, the carrier will be required to transmit a change to update the current conveyance record or cargo record when any of the data elements on the current transmission to the CBSA change. Individual data elements are not to be transmitted separately.

95. However, if a CCN or Supplementary Reference Number (SRN) on a cargo transmission or the actual CRN on a conveyance transmission needs to be changed, the client must first transmit a record to delete the cargo, conveyance, or supplementary report, and then transmit an “Add” for the new report with the new CCN, SRN or CRN. A change request will not be accepted in that case.

96. A “Delete” (cancel) is used for the complete removal of records or packages of records. If individual data elements or loops of segments are to be deleted, these must be processed as changes. The specific data transmitted on the delete does not necessarily have to be identical to the original add or change – only the “key” data (i.e. CCN or CRN and whether the record is a cargo or conveyance) must be identical.

97. Deletions may be made at any time up until arrival at the port of report. Note: un-arrived cargo and conveyance records are to be deleted (cancelled) if unused within 30 days.

98. Prior to loading, electronic changes will restart the 24-hour clock. A new EDTL must be transmitted to reflect the new time of loading. The CBSA will then have 24 hours to review the new information.

99. If additional information is required by the CBSA for risk assessment purposes while a container is on a “Do not load” or on a “Hold” status, the carrier and/or freight forwarder will be required to make changes. If a change/amendment is submitted in response to a “Do not load” notice, loading can proceed once a cancellation notice is received.

100. For conveyance transmissions, electronic cancellations will be accepted at any time as long as there are no related cargo transmissions on file. If a vessel is no longer coming to Canada, the electronic conveyance transmission must be deleted.

Failure to Submit Pre-arrival/Pre-load Information

101. The CBSA requires complete information pertaining to all specified goods arriving in Canada. Where no pre-load/pre-arrival information was transmitted and no other exemption or exception exists, the carrier must transmit a cargo report as soon as it is discovered. Should the CBSA discover goods for which no pre-load/pre-arrival was transmitted, and for which no report was made to CBSA, sanctions may be issued to the carrier for non-report.

ACI Exemptions

102. This section will cover circumstances in which pre-load/pre-arrival cargo and/or conveyance data is not required under Section 12.1 of the Customs Act.

103. Should clients choose to transmit data for any of the listed exemptions and/or exceptions they must do so within the timeframes specified in Appendix A. A complete list of the information that a carrier must include in the conveyance and cargo transmission(s) are found in Chapter 1: ACI Marine ECCRD.

Note: The CBSA will perform periodic monitoring of the records kept by carriers related to electronic conveyance and cargo information, as identified in paragraph 14 in this memorandum. This will include information that may be transmitted, should clients choose to do so, for commercial goods and conveyances that otherwise fall under exemptions/exceptions.

Exemptions From Cargo and Conveyance Data Sets

104. The following are exemptions from Cargo and Conveyance Data sets:

  • (a) CSA Shipments (full load) – for eligible goods that meet the requirements under Section 10.2 of the Accounting for Imported Goods and Payment of Duties Regulations;
  • (b) Canadian and foreign military cargo when on a military leased or owned vessel;
  • (c) Canadian and foreign government cargo when on a government leased or owned vessel;
  • (d) Fish reported on a fishing vessel including the conveyance report for the fishing vessel;
  • (e) Ferries, when not transporting commercial goods for which the ferry conveyance operator has a contract of carriage. Commercial goods for which a highway carrier has the contract of carriage and are being transported by a highway carrier on board a ferry are subject to highway pre-arrival requirements (see Memorandum D3-4-2, Highway Pre-arrival and Reporting Requirements);
  • (f) Foreign scientific, exploratory or research vessels;
  • (g) Ancillary equipment – all vessels, regardless of registry, operating exclusively in international trade may transport stevedoring equipment from port to port in Canada only if the equipment is imported temporarily and is used solely for the loading, discharging, and handling of cargo;
  • (h) Mail (Canada Post, US mail, international) – Full load only;
  • (i) Hand-carried commercial goods;
  • (j) In-ballast/empty vessels;
  • (k) Dunnage – Packaging material such as boards, blocks, planks, metal or plastic bracing, used in supporting and securing packages for shipping and handling.

Exemptions From Cargo Data – Only Conveyance Data Required

105. The following are exempted from the Cargo Data sets; conveyance data is required.

  • (a) Mail (Canada Post, US Mail, Diplomatic Mail, International) – as part of a mixed load;
  • (b) Ferries – Vessels, scows, barges, and similar craft whether self-propelled or towed, used solely or principally for the transportation of vehicles and passengers across international waters shall be classified as ferries.

106. All of the above exemptions, with the exception of fish reported on a fishing vessel, must be reported, at the arrival of the vessel, to the local CBSA office, by presentation of a completed paper form A6, General Declaration and paper form A6A, Freight/Cargo Manifest.

107. Vessels arriving in-ballast (empty) for which ACI and a CACM has not been transmitted, must report upon arrival of the vessel, to the local CBSA office, by presentation of a completed form A6, General Declaration.

108. The CBSA form BSF732, National Targeting Centre – Pre-arrival Notice may also be submitted to the National Targeting Centre (NTC) to assist in expedited clearance by email: cbsa-asfc-pans/aa@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca.

109. Cargo that is to be discharged in Canada must be reported, at the arrival of the vessel, to the local CBSA office by presentation of a completed form A6A, Freight/Cargo Manifest.

110. When copies of bills of lading are filed, a summary list of bill of lading numbers must be attached to the inward paper form A6A, Freight/Cargo Manifest, and must include a list of all the marks and numbers of cargo containers on board.

111. When one bill of lading covers more than one container load, the number of pieces in each container and the total number of pieces in all containers must be shown on the bill of lading.

112. Under local arrangements, non-duplicating numbers assigned by agents or dock operators may be accepted as CBSA inward report numbers. When a carrier maintains a computerized cargo system and its reports are numbered within the system, the numbers assigned by the carrier will be accepted as CBSA inward report numbers. In all other cases, CBSA will assign the inward report number from a local series beginning at number one (1) on April 1st each year.

113. The CCN for any shipment will consist of the carrier code, inward report number, a hyphen and the bill of lading number, e.g., 9386 1234-L12. For bulk cargo not carried under bills of lading, the complete cargo CCN will consist of the carrier code followed by the inward report number, e.g., 9386 1234.

Unique Shipment Processes

114. The following are not exempt from pre-load/pre-arrival data; however the reporting and/or pre-load/pre-arrival requirements differ in some manner.

ACI Transmission and Reporting Requirements for Multiple Canadian Ports of Call

115. Electronic conveyance and cargo transmissions must be transmitted to the FPOA as per the specified timeframes in Appendix A.

116. The conveyance data includes the requirement that all Canadian ports of call must be transmitted. Individual cargo transmissions will reflect the specific Canadian port of discharge for that cargo.

117. Foreign or U.S. registered vessels must provide a paper form A6, General Declaration inward and outward report at each subsequent port of call after the FPOA. The CRN submitted on the paper form A6 – General Declaration must match the reference number transmitted on the electronic conveyance report.

Example: a foreign vessel calls into the port of Montréal where it discharges cargo, proceeds to Hamilton to discharge cargo, and continues on to Sault Ste. Marie where more cargo is discharged. The marine carrier transmits ACI conveyance report to the FPOA, Montréal. On departure from Montréal, the marine carrier will present a paper form A6 outward conveyance report. A paper form A6 – General Declaration inward conveyance report will be presented upon arrival in Hamilton. Then, on departure from Hamilton, a paper form A6 – General Declaration outward conveyance report will be presented. The same paper process will be repeated at the Port of Sault Ste. Marie, i.e. a paper form A6 – General Declaration inward report and a paper form A6 – General Declaration outward conveyance report upon departure.

118. The requirement for conveyance reporting on paper at the subsequent Canadian ports of discharge is an interim process and will be eliminated in a future phase of ACI.

119. There are no requirements for a Canadian vessel to submit paper form A6, General Declaration at subsequent ports of call.

In-transit Shipments

120. When cargo arriving in Canada by vessel is unloaded from the conveyance and moves in-transit through Canada and the marine carrier’s contract of carriage ends in a country other than Canada, the in-transit movement type code “23” must be provided. In addition, consignee information must be provided in the consignee name and address fields.

121. When the carrier’s contract of carriage ends in Canada and they are aware that the shipment is in-transit, the CBSA requires that they transmit their cargo as per above, with the in-transit movement type code “23”. However, if the carriers system will not accept the code, the words “in-transit” should be provided in the remarks field, along with movement type code 24 (cargo import).

122. The CBSA acknowledges carriers are not always aware that the shipment is in-transit. If this is the case, the pre-arrival/pre-load requirements differ based on whether supplementary cargo data is are required:

  • (a) If there is no supplementary cargo data, then the import movement type code 24 would be accepted on the cargo transmission. The consignee name and address would be provided in the consignee name and address fields. A Canadian name and address would also be transmitted in the delivery address fields. This may be a warehouse, rail yard.
  • (b) If there is supplementary cargo data, the cargo transmission would continue to be coded as an import. The shipper and consignee would be transmitted as the freight forwarder. The supplementary cargo transmission(s) would be coded as an in-transit. The shipper would be transmitted in the shipper name and address fields. The consignee in the foreign country would be transmitted in the consignee name and address fields.

123. Since it was expressed that carriers do not always know the shipment will be in-transit, the CBSA has allowed for two different scenarios as outlined above. In the first scenario, the carrier is aware that the cargo is in-transit and is able to provide the non-Canadian consignee address but as a Canadian address is always required for import or in-transit movement types, the Canadian delivery address must be provided in the “Delivery Address” fields. In the second scenario, the carrier is not aware that the cargo is in-transit and provides the Canadian address of the freight forwarder to whom the carrier delivers the goods. In this scenario, the freight forwarder would then provide the supplementary report that has the non-Canadian consignee address.

Freight Remaining on Board Cargo

124. For all goods that are FROB in Canada while in-transit to a third country (including the United States) and never intended to be imported into Canada, the conveyance operating carrier must comply with the requirement to provide cargo and conveyance information within the timeframes specified in Appendix A of this memorandum. The FROB movement type code 26 must be provided.

125. For more information on transmission requirements for FROB cargo, please refer to Chapter 1: ACI Marine ECCRD.

Consortium and Co-load Agreements

126. Only one conveyance transmission is to be transmitted per vessel, per voyage/trip, by the conveyance operating carrier. Consortium partner cargo carriers should not transmit a conveyance report, unless they are the conveyance operating carrier.

127. When a vessel carries cargo for more than one carrier under either consortium or co-load arrangements, the conveyance and associated cargo transmission(s) must be submitted as outlined below:

  • (a) the conveyance operating carrier or a service provider authorized by that carrier to transmit on their behalf must submit the pre-arrival conveyance transmission. The CRN must have a “C” after the carrier code to identify the consortium arrangement. The carrier codes of the consortium carriers responsible for the cargo must be transmitted in the appropriate data element field; and,
  • (b) the conveyance operating carrier establishes the CRN. The CRN links all cargo transmission(s) to the vessel on which the cargo is to arrive. Therefore, the CRN must be transmitted on all cargo transmission(s) of each consortium partner. The conveyance operating carrier must assign and communicate the CRN to all consortium partners well in advance of the first load port in order that all carriers in the consortium partnership can transmit their cargo data 24 hours before loading.

Emergency Stops

128. Emergency stops are defined as stops for medical, weather, mechanical difficulties or security threats.

129. When pre-load/pre-arrival data has been transmitted and these stops exceed 8 hours, carriers will be required to advise the National Targeting Centre (NTC) by telephone with the updated information. Cargo data must be updated electronically as soon as known to reflect the new FPOA and its EDTA.

NTC: 1-855-NTC-1CNC (1-855-682-1262 within Canada or the U.S.A.) or 1-613-941-0004 (Overseas callers, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week).

130. If the emergency stop is less than eight hours, no update to the conveyance transmission is required.

Diversions

131. The following procedures are applicable if the carrier is informed, while en route to Canada, that some but not all of the containers on a cargo report are being diverted to another location upon arrival in Canada:

  • (a) A change to the original cargo transmission must be transmitted, removing the diverted container(s) and changing the weight, number of units and any other applicable data elements; and
  • (b) A new cargo report must be submitted with a new CCN to identify the containers that have been removed from the original CCN. A notation must be made in the special remarks field showing the original CCN and indicating that the shipment is a diversion.

Unscheduled Diversions

132. For vessels carrying cargo that must arrive at an unscheduled Canadian port due to unforeseen circumstances and are ACI-capable, pre-load/pre-arrival information must be submitted to the CBSA as soon as it is known, at which point the CBSA will conduct appropriate risk assessment.

133. Timeframes for an ACI transmission will be relaxed in the event the vessel is already at sea at the time of the diversion.

134. Carriers are required to include the reason for the diversion in the “Special Remarks” field of the ACI cargo data transmission.

135. For vessels being operated by carriers who do not have the ability to communicate with the CBSA via EDI, whether due to closure of the carrier’s office/system or lack of a CBSA carrier code, the appropriate documentation [carrier, vessel (PAN and paper form A6), crew, cargo (paper form A6A, Freight/Cargo Manifest), and container information (ship’s manifest)], is to be scanned and sent via email to the NTC, with a “CC” to the nearest CBSA marine port at which the cargo and conveyance will arrive. Please refer to Appendix C for a list of email addresses. The carrier is also required to advise the Technical Commercial Client Unit support line of the outage. Once the office has been re-opened, the carrier will be required to transmit full ACI cargo reports; keying of conveyance reports would not be required. In the special remarks field on the cargo report, the carrier is required to note that paper documentation was presented at time of arrival.

136. If the carrier’s office in one location is closed due to the unforeseen circumstances, but their other office is open, ACI will be transmitted but will be outside of the required timeframes. Timelines (pre-load/due date) will be relaxed and risk assessment will be prioritized. Carriers will be instructed to include the reason for the unforeseen diversion in the special remarks field of their transmission.

137. No persons or cargo are to be offloaded from the vessel prior to CBSA risk assessment having been conducted. The CBSA will have one hour to perform risk assessment once they have sent confirmation of receipt of a ship’s manifest submission. Offloading is not to occur until the one hour has elapsed from CBSA confirmation of receipt of a ship’s manifest submission. If further customs processing is required of the vessel, cargo, or crew the carrier will be notified within that one hour time period.

138. In cases where a carrier had originally transmitted the movement type on the ACI cargo report as FROB but now wants to move the goods in-transit via another mode for furtherance to the intended destination, the carrier is required to transmit a change. However, if the carrier’s system is down due to the unexpected or unforeseen diversions, the carrier is to contact the NTC to do the change.

139. In cases where the ACI cargo report was transmitted and the carrier wishes to off-load the cargo to remain on the dock until it can be exported by another vessel, the carrier is required to contact the NTC for permission to off-load the cargo.

Goods Found Astray (Misrouted Goods)

140. Carriers must transmit ACI for all goods being transported to Canada, including Canadian goods found astray outside of Canada, unless there is an exemption or exception.

141. Foreign goods found astray in Canada must be electronically transmitted post arrival as soon as they are discovered by the carrier. The goods may then be exported in accordance with the Reporting of Exported Goods Regulations and as outlined in Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements.

Overages

142. Any excess in the quantity of goods transmitted in the same shipment and found by the carrier/freight forwarder post arrival are considered overages. Carriers/freight forwarders are required to report any overages to the CBSA as soon as they are discovered by transmitting a post arrival change to the original cargo transmission. An overage occurs only where pre-load/pre-arrival data was transmitted and the quantity of goods initially reported upon arrival at FPOA, is found, by the carrier/freight forwarder to exceed the quantity of goods reported to the CBSA pre-load/pre-arrival and upon arrival. If no data was transmitted pre-load/pre-arrival and no report occurred, and the goods are discovered post arrival, this constitutes non-report, not an overage, and may be subject to penalty action.

Shortages

143. A shortage occurs only where pre-load/pre-arrival data was transmitted and the quantity of goods initially reported upon arrival at FPOA was found by the carrier/freight forwarder to be less than the quantity of goods reported to the CBSA pre-load/pre-arrival and upon arrival. Carriers/freight forwarders are required to report any shortages to the CBSA as soon as they are discovered by transmitting a post arrival change to the original cargo transmission.

Non-resident Importer

144. For shipments being delivered to Canada where the consignee is a non-resident importer, the foreign name and address of the consignee will be accepted in the consignee name and address fields in the cargo transmission.

145. The Canadian party to whom the cargo is being delivered to must be provided in the delivery party name and address fields. The delivery party name and address may be a warehouse, rail yard, etc., if that is where the carrier’s contract of carriage ends.

Transmitting “To Order” Shipments

146. In acknowledgment of common business practices the CBSA will accept “To Order”; “To Order of Shipper”; “To Order of Bank”; or “Other Named Entity” in the consignee field provided the name and address of the owner or owner’s representative is transmitted as a “Notify Party”.

147. To help clarify, the following examples illustrate the CBSA’s requirements:

Example 1: “To Order” and “To Order of Shipper”
The CBSA will accept “To Order” and “To Order of Shipper” in the consignee name field. The address information, city name, and country are mandatory fields for the consignee and ideally the Shipper’s coordinates would be repeated. However, the CBSA will accept terms such as “Same as Shipper”; “See Above”; etc., in the address information field and city name. The name and address of the owner or owner’s representative would be provided in the “Notify Party” fields. The delivery address, if different, would be transmitted in the “Delivery Address” fields.

Example 2: “To Order of Bank or Other Named Entity”
The name of the bank or the named entity must be transmitted in the consignee name field. Again, because the address information, city name, and country are mandatory fields, the complete address of the bank, or other named entity, must be transmitted in the consignee name and address fields. The name and address of the party taking receipt of the goods in Canada must be transmitted in the “Notify Party” fields. The delivery address, if different, from the address provided in the “Notify Party” fields must be transmitted in the “Delivery Address” fields.

Moving Company and Personal Effects

148. When personal effects are being imported into Canada the name and address of the actual consignee is required. The name of the moving company may be provided in the “Notify Party” fields.

Tugs and Barges

149. Pre-load/pre-arrival data requirements pertaining to tugs and barges are to be transmitted within the timeframes outlined in Appendix A of this memorandum.

150. Tugs and barges are both considered conveyances and pre-load/pre-arrival conveyance data must be submitted for each tug and/or barge.

151. The same voyage/trip number must be transmitted in the applicable fields on all transmissions associated with all tugs, barges and cargo that are involved in the following scenarios.

152. A tug pulling one or more barges without cargo: If there is no cargo on any of the barges being pulled by the tug, there is no ACI requirement for pre-load/pre-arrival cargo and conveyance data. The reporting would be done on a paper form A6. In addition, the CBSA form BSF732, National Targeting Centre – Pre-arrival Notice may also be submitted to the National Targeting Centre (NTC) to assist in expedited clearance by email: cbsa-asfc-pans/aa@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca.

153. A tug pulling one or more barges with cargo: Cargo data must be transmitted for the cargo on each barge, referencing the corresponding CRN. Conveyance data would be transmitted electronically for the tug. Conveyance data would also be transmitted for each barge. The voyage/trip number for the tug, the barge(s) and the cargo must be the same. The number of crew is to be transmitted on the tug conveyance report. A zero is to be transmitted in the number of crew field for the conveyance transmission for each barge.

154. A tug pulling a mix of barges with cargo, and barges without cargo: Cargo transmissions must be transmitted electronically for the cargo on each barge, referencing the corresponding CRN. No cargo transmissions are required for the empty barge(s). A conveyance transmission is to be transmitted electronically for all of the barges and for the tug. The voyage/trip number for the tug, the barge(s) and the cargo must be the same. The number of the crew must be indicated on the tug conveyance transmission. A zero is to be transmitted in the number crew field for the conveyance transmission for each barge, unless there are crew onboard the barge, then number of crew onboard each barge must also be transmitted.

155. Self-propelled barges: cargo transmissions must be transmitted for the cargo on each barge, referencing the corresponding CRN. A conveyance transmission must be transmitted electronically for each barge. If there is more than one barge the same voyage/trip number must be shown on all of the cargo and conveyance transmissions. If there is more than one barge for this scenario, the number of crew must only be transmitted on one of the barge conveyance transmissions; a zero will be submitted in that field on the other conveyance transmission(s).

156. A tug carrying cargo and towing empty barges: cargo transmissions must be submitted for the cargo, referencing the CRN of the tug. A conveyance transmission must be transmitted electronically to represent the tug.

157. An in ballast (empty) tug that is not pulling barges: There is no requirement for electronic pre-load/pre-arrival cargo and conveyance transmission. A paper form A6, General Declaration must be completed in paper format and submitted to CBSA upon arrival. In addition, the CBSA form BSF732, National Targeting Centre – Pre-arrival Notice may also be submitted to the National Targeting Centre (NTC) to assist in expedited clearance by email: cbsa-asfc-pans/aa@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca.

Military Vessels Carrying Solely Military Cargo on Board

Foreign Military Vessels

158. Foreign military vessels are not required to file a paper form A6, General Declaration for inward or outward movements. The masters of these vessels are authorized to make courtesy oral reports to the CBSA.

159. Foreign military vessels, including ships of war, military transports, military supply ships, and military support vessels which are owned or controlled by the government of any country are entitled to ships’ stores as per the Schedule to the Ships’ Stores Regulations.

160. Where visiting forces are stationed in Canada, their goods may be imported without payment of duties and taxes under the provisions of tariff item 9827.00.00.

Canadian Military Vessels

161. Canadian military vessels are not required to present a paper form A6, General Declaration for inward and outward movements. The masters of these vessels are authorized to make courtesy oral reports to the CBSA.

162. Canadian military vessels that are proceeding outside Canada and military service ships that are required to report under section 95 of the Customs Act (outward report) and that are proceeding outside Canada are entitled to ships’ stores as per the Schedule to the Ships’ Stores Regulations. The term “proceed outside Canada” means to advance beyond:

  • (a) the land mass of Canada;
  • (b) the internal waters; or
  • (c) the territorial sea of Canada.

163. The master of a Canadian warship or service ship must advise the local CBSA office on the 31st day the vessel has been in a Canadian port that the vessel will be remaining in port. An inventory is then to be completed by the CBSA of all ships’ stores aboard the vessel. Following the completion of the inventory, the sale on board of these goods will no longer be permitted, the designation of these materials as Ships Stores as per the Schedule to the Ships’ Stores Regulations will be lost, thus allowing the purchase of similar goods in the local economy by crew members.

164. Declarations as returning residents are required from members of the crew upon their arrival from foreign ports or high seas maneuvers of a duration of more than 48 hours. Crew members are entitled to the personal exemptions provided under 98.04 of the Customs Tariff.

Government Vessels

165. Canadian government vessels are defined as those vessels owned, leased, or operated by the federal or provincial governments of Canada. Canadian Coast Guard vessels, as well as Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Hydrographic Services vessels, are included in this category. Military vessels are not included in this group.

166. Vessels commanded by officers appointed by the Government of Canada or a provincial government must present a completed a paper form A6, General Declarationin the following circumstances:

  • (a) when arriving from a foreign port;
  • (b) when departing from a foreign port; or
  • (c) when taking aboard in bond stores.

167. Government vessels must meet safety inspection and certificate of competency requirements under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.

168. Canadian Coast Guard ships that are proceeding on a voyage to the Arctic are entitled to ships’ stores as per the Schedule of the Ships’ Stores Regulations. Canadian-registered vessels that are operated by the Government of Canada to obtain scientific data on the high seas, including weather, research, and fisheries patrol ships, are also entitled to ships’ stores.

169. Personal declarations are required from crew when returning from a foreign port. Crew members are entitled to personal exemptions under heading 98.04.of the Customs Tariff.

Fishing Vessels

170. The CBSA cooperates with the Fisheries and Oceans Canada in the administration of programs under the Coastal Fisheries Protection Act. Under these programs, fishing vessels from designated countries, referred to as “licensed foreign fishing vessels” are permitted entry into Canadian fishing waters to acquire Canadian fish and fish products. The CBSA’s role under these programs is to facilitate the inward and outward movements of licensed foreign fishing vessels while satisfying all requirements of the Customs Act and the legislation of Other Governmental Departments (OGDs).

171. Licensed foreign fishing vessels must report inward at the nearest CBSA office, as per inward report instructions, prior to commencing their fishing operation under licence with Fisheries and Oceans Canada. A vessel operating outside the territorial sea, and proceeding outside Canada is entitled to ships stores as a fishing ship reported and proceeding outside Canada. For additional information please refer to Ships’ Stores Regulations. Licensed foreign fishing vessels operating within the territorial sea are not entitled to ships stores.

172. Licensed foreign fishing vessels operating without bonded stores will be granted a seasonal clearance after initial inward report. This clearance will be valid for the duration of the season and will relieve vessels from the requirement to enter only at ports having CBSA services.

173. Licensed foreign fishing vessels operating with bonded stores will have their stores sealed while in port or when operating within the territorial sea. Crew members will be permitted the alcohol and tobacco allowances permitted to all visitors, as outlined in Memorandum D2-1-1, Temporary Importation of Baggage and Conveyance by Non-residents. Licensed foreign fishing vessels leaving Canada with bonded stores must enter a port having CBSA service upon their return.

174. Licensed foreign fishing vessels landing fish and fish products in Canada must file a paper form A6A, Freight/Cargo Manifest with the CBSA.

175. The CBSA must be advised whenever a change in the crew on board licensed foreign fishing vessels occurs. The master of the vessel is responsible for ensuring that the CBSA receives a report of all crew members offloaded for medical treatment or crew rest.

176. Fisheries program vessels without a seasonal clearance must file an outward report to the CBSA on form A6, on each occasion the vessel leaves the territorial sea. For more information on outward reports and cargo export, please refer to Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements.

177. Fisheries program vessels are not considered to be in the coasting trade unless they engage in the practice of moving goods between two points in Canada. In that case, procedures outlined in Memorandum D3-5-7, Temporary Importation of Vessels, must be followed. The movement of fish or fish products from a Fisheries program vessel to another within the territorial sea is not considered to be coasting when the receiving vessel is moving the cargo outside of Canada for export.

178. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans has identified several transhipment points within the territorial sea where Fisheries program vessels can meet, with the prior approval of the nearest CBSA office, for transfer of crew, supplies, or fish and fish products. the transfer of fuel between fisheries program vessels within the territorial sea is prohibited due to environmental concerns.

179. Spare parts and fuel to be consumed in Canada are subject to the provisions of the Customs Tariff and the Excise Tax Act.

180. Fisheries program vessels entering Canada from a foreign port for the purpose of going to a transhipment point must satisfy requirements outlined in paragraph 205.

Ferries

181. Vessels, scows, barges, and similar craft whether self-propelled or towed, used solely or principally for the transportation of vehicles and passengers across international waters shall be classified as ferries.

182. Ferries operating internationally must file with the CBSA one inward and one outward report on paper form A6, General Declaration, at the close of each day’s operations. For more information on outward report, please refer to Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements. Each report must specify the number of trips made during the day and the total number of passengers carried. An itemized record of tourist automobiles, trucks, etc., is not required but the total number of vehicles in each class must be shown for each trip.

183. Passenger ferries without commercial goods are exempt from ACI.

184. Ferries are required to transmit pre-arrival cargo and conveyance information as well as a CACM when transporting commercial and personal goods for which the ferry conveyance operator has a contract of carriage.

185. Ferries are considered as an extension de the highway mode therefore, any goods or cargo transported on a ferry are considered to be an extension of the highway mode. For reporting requirements on the highway mode, please refer to the Memorandum D3-4-2, Highway Pre-arrival and Reporting Requirements.

186. Passengers and their goods embarking onto or disembarking from a ferry are subject to normal reporting requirements. For more information on the normal reporting requirements, please refer to D2 series, International Travel.

187. Railway car ferries operating internationally may report inward on form A1 in lieu of the paper form A6 – General Declaration when the goods carried in each car are reported on separate cargo control documents. For more information on Rail reporting, please refer to Memoranda D3-6-6, Rail Pre-arrival and Reporting Requirements.

Yachts

188. Yachts are determined to be commercial or non-commercial (private), depending on the purpose of the vessel’s entry to Canada.

189. A yacht is determined to be a commercial vessel if any of the passengers have paid for passage or if the vessel is:

  • (a) transporting commercial goods,
  • (b) transporting goods for hire,
  • (c) conducting promotional business in Canada, and
  • (d) coming to Canada to pick up passengers who have paid for passage or to pick up cargo.

190. Commercial vessels are not permitted to report to the CBSA through the Telephone Reporting Centre (TRC). These vessels must report to the CBSA according to the procedures contained in this Memorandum, which includes direct report to a Port of Entry on a paper form A6, General Declaration, provision of the crew list, ships stores and all other documentation required under the Customs Act and the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act.

191. The yacht is determined to be non-commercial (private), if the purpose of the trip is for pleasure or leisure only. Yachts owned by private citizens or corporations are considered non-commercial if:

  • (a) no person on board has paid for passage;
  • (b) the vessel is not transporting commercial goods or goods for remuneration; and,
  • (c) the corporation is not conducting promotional activities on board the vessel while in Canada.

192. The reporting requirements for these non-commercial (private) yachts depend on the number of passengers on board including the crew. Yachts that are carrying 29 persons or fewer, including the crew, are permitted to report to the CBSA through the TRC. Yachts that are carrying more than 29 persons, including the crew, must report to the CBSA directly at the Port of Entry.

ETA - Entered to Arrive and Value Included (VI) Shipments

193. Cargo and conveyance data is required for ETA and VI type shipments. The CBSA will manually acquit the cargo data with the original transaction number associated with the goods.

Ships’ Stores (Goods Imported for Ships Stores)

194. Defined as goods imported into Canada by airlines or vessels specifically for delivery to vessels or a bonded warehouse. Please refer to Memorandum D4-2-1, Ships’ Stores Regulations for additional information.

195. Pre-load/pre-arrival cargo and conveyance information pertaining to goods imported for ships stores into Canada must be transmitted electronically within the guidelines and procedures outlined in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations and this memorandum.

Duty Free Shops (Goods Imported by Duty Free Shops)

196. Defined as goods imported into Canada by Duty Free Shops and delivered directly to a licensed Duty Free Shop facility. Please refer to Memoranda D4-3-4, Duty Free Shop – Operational Responsibilities and Memorandum D4-3-5, Duty-Free Shop – Inventory Control and Sales Requirements for additional information on Duty Free Shops.

197. Pre-load/pre-arrival and conveyance information pertaining to goods imported and delivered directly to a licensed duty free shop must be transmitted electronically within the guidelines and procedures outlined in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations and this memorandum.

Tariff Treatment of Vessels in International Service

198. For the purposes of this memorandum, a Canadian vessel is defined as a vessel engaged in international commercial transportation which is registered in Canada, and

  • (a) was built in Canada;
  • (b) all duties have been paid; or
  • (c) has been deemed to be duty paid under the terms of some other Act.
  • Note: Any vessel that is not a “Canadian vessel” as defined above is deemed to be a foreign vessel for CBSA purposes and, if in international service, should be classified under tariff item No. 9801.10.10.

199. Canadian vessels in international commercial service are not admissible under tariff item No. 9801.10.10. Rather they are to be classified under either tariff item No. 9813.00.00 or No. 9814.00.00, if applicable. Where Canadian vessels arriving in Canada do not qualify for importation under either of these tariff items, they shall be classified under the appropriate tariff item in Chapter 89.

200. Where Canadian vessels are returning to Canadian waters and repairs and modifications were done during the course of the vessel’s operations abroad, customs duties may be reduced or removed as provided under the Vessel Duties Reduction or Removal Regulations. All such repairs or enhancements shall be reported to the CBSA and duly accounted for upon the vessel’s first return to Canada, even if the vessel is continuing in international service.

201. A foreign vessel must either be formally accounted at the CBSA or exported from Canada within 30 days of such a declaration.

202. Vessels operating in international commercial service that are unable to depart from Canada due to ice conditions will not be considered as imported. They should be documented in an appropriate manner and allowed to leave at the earliest opportunity.

203. Any vessel classified under tariff item No. 9801.10.00 and subsequently diverted to a dutiable use in Canada, is considered as having been diverted from the use originally intended and the importer will be held liable for payment of full duty under the appropriate tariff item in Chapter 89 of the Customs Tariff.

Vessel’s Clearance Requirements – General

204. All vessels in international commercial service arriving in Canada must present without delay to the nearest CBSA office designated for the clearance of vessels. The complete inward report package includes: form E1, Ships Stores Declaration; Crew List (FAL form 5) and Passenger List (FAL form 6), if applicable; the form BSF552, Crew’s Effects Declaration. The package must be presented to the CBSA prior to any persons being allowed to disembark or embark the vessel, or any cargo being discharged.

205. For vessels exempted from ACI, the completed form A6, General Declaration must be submitted to the CBSA.

206. All copies of the paper form A6, General Declaration will be date-stamped and signed by a CBSA officer. The presence of the CBSA signature and date-stamp signifies acceptance of the inward report and is not to be considered a validation of all information of the form. A copy must be kept by the carrier as a proof of report.

207. Cargo may only be discharged with CBSA permission as signified by the presence of a CBSA officer’s signature and date-stamp on the paper form A6, General Declaration.

208. After the paper form A6, General Declaration is numbered (when required), date-stamped and signed by a CBSA officer, copies will be distributed as follows:

  • (a) one copy with attachments retained by the CBSA;
  • (b) one copy with attachments to Statistics Canada; and,
  • (c) one copy faxed back to the vessel or to the agent for presentation to the harbour master.

209. Normally, arrangements to clear a vessel in international commercial service can be made with the local CBSA office in advance with the submission of a completed BSF732, National Targeting Centre – Pre-arrival Notice to the NTC via email, either by the ship’s agent or master.

210. It is the master’s responsibility to ensure that no goods are discharged from the vessel, that no one other than a pilot, medical officer of health, or an officer acting in an official capacity is allowed to board the vessel, and that no one is allowed to leave the vessel, until such time as CBSA requirements have been completed.

211. With the prior consent of the CBSA, officers from OGDs, supercargoes, or ships agents may accompany a CBSA officer on board to complete official or company business, provided there is no interference with CBSA procedures which are to take precedence over any other transactions.

212. Any person authorized by the CBSA to board a vessel arriving from a foreign port for which an inward report has not been filed, is to report to the CBSA and have articles such as cameras, portable computers, etc.

213. If a vessel that arrives from a foreign port requires anchoring in the harbour or stream, due to exceptional circumstances, a CBSA officer may proceed aboard to accept the ships stores list, crew declaration, and seal ships stores only if all health and safety requirements are met, and local management deems that it is safe to do so. Masters or agents are to be advised that the boarding of the vessel for this purpose is simply a preliminary function carried out to enable the vessel to proceed with local port routine without undue delay, and is not to be considered a substitute for formal reporting or CBSA clearance procedures. When practicable, the formal inward report may be taken at this time; should the vessel arrive after hours, the ship’s master or agent may present the inward report the following day.

214. Vessels moving through locks in a canal system will not be boarded upon or disembarked from by a CBSA officer unless fully stopped, anchored and secured to the canal wall. Under no circumstances will an officer board such a vessel other than by way of a properly secured gangplank. Similarly, vessels in stream will not be boarded upon or disembarked from unless stopped and anchored. Rope ladders that are completely secured will only be used when no other practical alternative exists.

215. Use of water taxis for channel clearances is at the vessel operator’s expense. The CBSA will only pay for such taxis where the vessel is being boarded exclusively for official CBSA purposes.

216. Where a vessel arrives in Canada flying a yellow quarantine flag (infectious disease), the CBSA officer will not conduct normal clearance procedures until advised by the appropriate health authority that it is safe to do so. Pending such notification, the CBSA officer, with the help of the local police authority or the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), as judged appropriate, will endeavour to ensure that the vessel is maintained in a sterile condition pending cancellation of the health alert by the competent health authority. For more information, please refer to the Quarantine Act.

217. In the event that the CBSA is advised of a death or serious injury on board a vessel arriving in Canada, the CBSA officer will promptly advise the appropriate police and health authorities, will authorize their embarkation on board the vessel at the earliest possible moment and will endeavour to assist them in carrying out an investigation of the incident and assist them in removing any injured or deceased persons. However, the CBSA officer will remain responsible for maintaining control over the situation and ensuring that CBSA requirements are completed even if delayed.

218. On occasion, CBSA officers will board the vessel to ensure that it is in compliance with the registration, safety compliance, and crew certification provisions of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001. This will include verifying that the following documents are present and valid:

  • (a) Certificate of Registry;
  • (b) Passenger Ship Safety Certificate;
  • (c) Cargo Ship Safety Certificate (500 tons or more);
  • (d) Cargo Ship Safety Equipment Certificate;
  • (e) Cargo Ship Safety Radiotelegraphy Certificate or Cargo Ship Safety Radiotelephony Certificate (under 1600 tons);
  • (f) Load Line Certificate;
  • (g) Officers’ Certificates of Competency; and/or,
  • (h) Certificate of Insurance or other financial security.

219. Where it is determined that a certificate is not present, is invalid, or is likely to expire prior to the anticipated departure date, the captain will be informed of this fact as well as the nearest ships safety office. Appropriate operational steps will be taken to ensure that the vessel is not granted an outward clearance until such time as a valid certificate is presented.

220. At this time (until such a time that a valid certificate is presented), the CBSA performs the functions of the shipping master at those locations where it is empowered to do so.

221. In instances where animals on board the vessel will be going ashore, they must first be reported to the CBSA. The CBSA will in turn notify the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), National Animal Health Program. Permission to disembark the animals will be granted only once authorization to do so is received from CFIA and once all necessary animal health permits are presented and validated.

Seaway Traffic

222. Under normal circumstances, vessels destined for ports west of Montréal, will not be boarded and sealed at Montréal nor will a passing report (inward/outward) be filed at that port, unless goods or persons are to be taken on board or discharged in Montréal, or the vessel is in port for more than 48 hours.

223. For vessels under ACI, Montréal will be considered as the FPOA and the electronic conveyance reports must be transmitted to this port.

224. Immigration forms will be submitted to the FPOA and passengers will be examined at that point.

225. CFIA, National animal health program requirements will be observed at Montréal.

226. Passenger baggage will be examined at the FPOA.

227. The CBSA, reserves the right to have any vessel at anchor, boarded and undergo complete customs formalities, including searching crew effects and the vessel, crew interrogations and documentation examination as deemed relevant to the presiding officer in accordance with the Customs Act and Regulations.

Vessels Arriving at Non-CBSA Ports

228. A carrier engaged in international trade with cargo for discharge at a place where a CBSA office is not located must first transmit ACI reports to a CBSA office and then report inward, in accordance with the provisions of the Customs Act and Regulations. Accounting documents must be presented at the nearest CBSA office for the goods on board for landing at the non-CBSA port and, at the discretion of the chief of operations of the local CBSA office, a CBSA officer will be in attendance to observe the discharge of the cargo.

229. The CBSA may grant permission for vessels to discharge or load cargo at non-CBSA ports subject to the provisions of the Special Services Regulations. (See Memorandum D1-2-1, Special Services.)

230. If the vessel has additional cargo for delivery at another CBSA seaport, accounting documents for this additional cargo must be presented at the CBSA office where the goods are to be unloaded.

231. Where a vessel in ballast (empty) properly reports inward at a CBSA office en route to the non-CBSA port, the attendance of a CBSA officer will not be required at the non-CBSA port to affect clearance of the vessel. However, the CBSA may wish to be present to provide clearance at its discretion.

232. Where vessel clearance is to be issued by the next CBSA port of call or directly to a foreign point as the case may be, and where clearance is given at the CBSA port, such clearance will be shown on the documentation as via the non-CBSA port.

Overland Movements

233. Marine carriers may forward freight in bond from a Canadian seaport(s) overland to a Canadian destination(s) for clearance or exportation without re-manifesting to a forwarding rail or highway carrier.

234. The overland movement procedure applies to all cargo intended for clearance in Canada. For goods intended for exportation to the U.S.A. the procedure may only be applied to containers that have the seals still intact. For more information on cargo for exportation, please refer to Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements.

235. All sets of the cargo reports must be arranged by approved destination points, including that portion intended for clearance or re-manifesting at the seaport of discharge.

236. In initiating the onward movement of the cargo to designated inland destinations, it will be the responsibility of the marine carrier to indicate on the bill of lading to the onward carrier that: “This cargo is in bond and carried under a paper form A6A, Freight/Cargo Manifest number . . . Do not manifest”. This will be an indication to the onward carrier that although the cargo is being carried as a domestic shipment in his system, the freight must be delivered to the sufferance warehouse at destination and held until CBSA authorizes its release.

237. Only once the shipment is released by the CBSA will the CBSA delivery authority copy be returned to the warehouse operator as authorization to allow delivery of the shipment.

238. Diversion notice procedures cannot be applied when a shipment has been reported under the overland movement procedure. If, after arrival at the CBSA office of destination as shown on paper form A6, General Declaration, a shipment is to be re-routed, the bonded marine carrier must arrange with the forwarding rail or highway carrier to prepare a re-manifested paper form A6 to cover the onward movement.

239. If the re-routing occurs at the seaport of discharge or a point en route to the destination port, and subsequent to CBSA processing of the paper form A6, General Declaration inward report, the forwarding carrier must present a re-manifested paper form A6 at the seaport of discharge.

240. In such cases, the marine carrier must ensure that the forwarding carrier annotates the re-manifested movement in the Description and Marks field on the re-manifested paper form A6, General Declaration, to show that the shipment has been covered by an overland cargo control document and to indicate the original designated CBSA office of destination. It will be the responsibility of the marine carrier/agent to present a photocopy of the station copy of the re-manifested paper form A6 to the CBSA at the seaport of discharge for validation by the CBSA. The properly annotated and validated photocopy will be sent by the seaport of discharge CBSA office to the originally designated receiving CBSA office. The validated photocopy of the station copy of the re-manifested paper form A6 will be used by the CBSA for acquittal of the paper form A6.

241. When the specified merchandise must be cleared within Canada, the carrier must advise each consignee of the arrival of the shipment at the moment of clearance by forwarding to them copies of the consignment and notifications to the long room regarding the clearance granted by CBSA. The consignee must then present these documents to the CBSA with the proper release documentation. It is the responsibility of the carrier to make certain that the notifications presented at the inward destination have the same CCN (carrier code, cargo control number and the consignment information) indicated on the initial declaration of freight presented at the seaport at the moment of offload in Canada.

242. All tracing of outstanding marine cargo control shipments will be directed by the CBSA to the marine carrier responsible for the overland movement.

Delivery Requirements and Transfers to Sufferance Warehouses

243. Cargo arriving by marine vessel under a marine cargo control document must be reported to a type AM or AW sufferance warehouse at the port of discharge. For more information on sufferance warehouses, please refer to Memorandum D4-1-4, Customs Sufferance Warehouses.

244. Cargo may only be transferred from the type AM or AW sufferance warehouse to another sufferance warehouse within the same CBSA office after presentation of an acceptable secondary cargo control document (re-manifest, house bill, or a marine bill of lading under the overland movement procedure), providing the warehouse is licensed to receive the freight. The party carrying the transfer from one sufferance warehouse to another must be bonded or other security considerations may be prescribed.

245. Single or consolidated shipments may be transferred to the freight forwarder’s sufferance warehouse (or agent thereof) for clearance, break bulk or furtherance after presentation of a secondary cargo control document(s) (house bill(s)) providing the warehouse is licensed to receive the freight. In order to transport non-acquitted goods, the freight forwarder must be bonded. For more information, please refer to Memorandum D3-3-1, Forwarded and Consolidated Cargo – Import Movements.

246. Intact cargo arriving in highway or rail service for export in bond under a marine cargo control document may be delivered directly to the designated seaport. For more information, please refer to Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements.

247. Shipments reported under the marine overland movement procedure may be delivered to another sufferance warehouse providing the follow two conditions are met:

  • (a) the warehouse has been approved as a designated release point under the marine carrier’s overland movement authority; and
  • (b) the warehouse is licensed to receive the freight.

248. Consolidated shipments consigned to a bonded freight forwarder may be transferred from a designated overland movement release point to the freight forwarder’s sufferance warehouse (or agent thereof) after presentation of secondary cargo control documents (house bills) providing the warehouse is licensed to receive the freight.

Coastwise Shipping

249. Vessels in international commercial service may drop off and pick up cargo at more than one location in Canada provided that all of the following conditions are met:

  • (a) the vessel was cleared by the CBSA at the time of its initial arrival in Canada;
  • (b) all crew disembarked or cargo unloaded originated outside of Canada; and
  • (c) all crew embarked or cargo laden on board is destined to a point or points outside of Canada.

250. Vessels moving as outlined in the previous paragraph are termed to be moving “Coastwise,” and are subject to CBSA control. It should be noted that this term is separate and distinct from the term “coasting,” which refers to the transportation of goods or people between points in Canada. For more information on passengers processing in coastwise, please refer to Memorandum D2-3-7, Marine Operations – Canada Border Services Agency Processing of Cruise Ships.

251. Vessels moving coastwise, whether laden or in ballast, remain subject to CBSA control and must be reported to the CBSA at each point of arrival and departure. Where the stay in port will be of a short duration, a combined paper form A6, General Declaration inward/outward vessel report may be accepted. Normal cargo reporting procedures will apply.

252. Vessels moving coastwise may not offload international waste or non-compliant wood packaging materials including dunnage, pallets or crating without the permission of a CBSA officer. Permission to offload international waste or non-compliant wood packing materials will only be granted where CFIA-approved facilities exist for the safe disposal of these items.

253. The CBSA officer boarding coastwise vessels will verify the security of the bonded stores’ seals and replace them if necessary. (Coastwise vessels that have transited international waters are permitted to arrive with their seals broken.) The CBSA officer will also make any required amendments to the crew list, and grant an issue of bonded stores where appropriate. Safety certificates will also be verified prior to an outwards coastwise report being accepted.

254. While passengers and crew are at liberty to entertain invited guests on board a ship in port, the presence of such persons is to be reported by the carrier, in writing to the CBSA prior to embarkation. Visitors are to be advised that any goods removed from the ship may be subject to duties. Searches of such persons or their possessions may be carried out where there are reasonable and probable grounds to suspect that the person is in possession of undeclared, dutiable goods. For more information on search of persons, please refer to Memorandum D2-3-7, Marine Operations – Canada Border Services Agency Processing of Cruise Ships.

255. Occasionally, requests are received from various interest groups, such as associations of travel agents or company officials, to travel between ports in Canada on vessels moving coastwise. All such requests are to be forwarded to the Transporter and Cargo Control Programs Unit.

256. Where approval is granted, the parties concerned will be advised that they are subject to customs examination at time of disembarkation. The Transporter and Cargo Control Programs Unit will grant approval in writing to the applicant. Copies will also be provided to all appropriate regional offices.

257. The outwards report of vessels moving coastwise must be made to the CBSA in sufficient time to permit inspection formalities to be completed prior to departure. The CBSA will not be responsible for delays in departure due to late outwards report from the marine company or its agent, or for delays due to non-compliance with legislative requirements. For more information on outward reporting, please refer to Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements.

258. Permission to sail may be refused by the CBSA where it has been determined that the vessel is not in compliance with Canadian law, or that any fees, duties, or penalties due to the Crown have not been paid. Any costs incurred by such delays will be the responsibility of the vessel operator.

Stevedoring Equipment

259. All vessels, regardless of registry, operating exclusively in international trade may transport stevedoring equipment from port to port in Canada only if the equipment is imported temporarily and is used solely for the loading, discharging, and handling of cargo.

International Waste

260. International waste refers to ship’s refuse that contains, or is suspected to contain any food, plant and animal product or by-product and that originated as food that was taken on a vessel, or as a result of transportation of animals on a vessel. International waste regulations apply to waste originating in all countries, other than the continental Unites States. In addition, certain fruit, vegetables and other plant products from all countries, including the United States, are prohibited entry into Canada under the Plant Protection Act and Regulations and these products must also be disposed of as international waste.

261. All international waste must be secured in containers whose top, sides and bottoms prevent the escape of solids and liquids, with a tightly fitting lid to reduce spills and prevent exposure to wildlife, vermin and birds. International waste may not be discharged into Canada without the permission of a CBSA officer.

262. All vessels will be considered to be carrying international waste upon their arrival in Canada and this waste may be subject to inspection by a CBSA officer. International waste may only be offloaded from the vessel with the permission of a CBSA officer and only where CFIA-approved routes and disposal facilities exist. If no CFIA-approved facilities exist at the port, international waste must be safely contained and remain on board the vessel.

Wood Packaging Material

263. Wood dunnage or ship borne dunnage refers to wood carried on a marine vessel and used to secure or support a commodity, but which does not remain with the commodity. Wood packaging refers to wood or wood products used in supporting, protecting material or carrying a commodity, including dunnage.

264. All non-compliant wood packaging materials, including dunnage, pallets or crating must be sealed on board the vessel and not discharged into Canada without the permission of a border services officer.

265. Vessels carrying wood packaging materials, including dunnage, pallets or crating made from non-manufactured wood must seek permission from a border services officer before off-loading these materials from the vessel. Wood packaging, dunnage, pallets and crating may not enter Canada unless the wood complies with requirements set out in ISPM No. 15, Guidelines for Regulating Wood Packaging Material in International Trade, or unless the wood packaging originates in the continental United States.

266. Non-compliant wood packaging materials, including dunnage, pallets, or crating may only be offloaded from the vessel with the permission of a border services officer and only where CFIA-approved disposal or processing facilities exist. If no CFIA-approved facilities exist at the port, all non-compliant wood packaging materials, including dunnage, pallets or crating, must be safely contained and remain on board the vessel.

Outward Report / Exports

267. For information on electronic outward reporting and exports, please refer to Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements and Chapter 1: ACI Marine ECCRD.

Coasting Licences

268. For information on coasting licenses, please refer to Memorandum D3-5-7, Temporary Importation of Vessels.

Post Arrival Changes

269. Changes to cargo data (post arrival) must be made as soon as they are known. Electronic changes by carriers will be allowed up to the point of final release status of the goods or manual acquittal. Requests for changes after release must be presented to the local CBSA office.

270. ACI changes for overages and shortages can be transmitted up to release of the cargo. If the cargo is moving inland it will not be released until it reaches the inland destination. Changes due to overages and shortages that occur after release must be submitted by a paper process. For information regarding at the border reporting of commercial goods and conveyances and the release of commercial goods, please see Information for importers.

Contingency Plan in the Event of System Failure

271. In the event of a CBSA system outage, all efforts will be made to continue normal communications, and restore systems to normal operating condition as soon as is reasonably possible.

272. Clients must retain the ability to produce hard copy cargo/conveyance declarations in the event of disruption CBSA systems.

Penalty Information

273. For information on administrative penalties, refer to Memorandum D22-1-1, Administrative Monetary Penalty System. Information on AMPS penalties is also available on the CBSA Web site.

274. Other administrative sanctions, such as the revocation of program privileges and penalties of OGDs, may also be applicable.

275. In some situations, failure to comply with the CBSA requirements outlined in the Customs Act, may result in the seizure and forfeiture of the goods and/or conveyance, and criminal charges may be applicable.

Additional Information

276. For more information, within Canada call the Border Information Service at 1-800-461-9999. From outside Canada call 204-983-3500 or 506-636-5064. Long distance charges will apply. Agents are available Monday to Friday (08:00 – 16:00 local time / except holidays). TTY is also available within Canada: 1-866-335-3237.

277. More information on the ACI Program may be obtained by consulting Chapter 1: ACI Marine ECCRD.


Appendix A

Pre-arrival Timeframes

The following chart summarizes the pre-arrival timeframes for transmitting Conveyance, Cargo, and Empty Cargo Container Data:

Conveyance Transmission Timeframes (cargo loaded in a country other than the U.S.)
Conveyances with containerized cargo 96 hours before arrival
Conveyances with break-bulk cargo 24 hours before arrival
Conveyances with bulk cargo 24 hours before arrival
Conveyances with empty marine containers 96 hours before arrival
Conveyances with a combination of goods described above 96 hours before arrival
Conveyance Transmission Timeframes (cargo loaded in the U.S.)
Conveyances with containerized, bulk or break-bulk 24 hours before arrival
Conveyances with empty containers 4 hours before arrival
Cargo Transmission Timeframes (cargo loaded in a country other than the U.S.)
Containerized cargo 24 hours before loading
Break-bulk cargo 24 hours before arrival
Bulk cargo 24 hours before arrival
Empty marine containers 96 hours before arrival
Cargo Transmission Timeframes (cargo loaded in the U.S.)
Containerized, bulk or break-bulk 24 hours before arrival
Empty marine containers 4 hours before arrival

Note: If the duration of the voyage is less than the pre-arrival timeframe required, data must be transmitted before the departure of the vessel to a port in Canada

Appendix B

Bulk Cargo

1. The CBSA defines bulk cargo as “goods that are loose or in mass, such that they are confined only by the permanent structures of a vessel, without intermediate containment or intermediate packaging.” Bulk cargo is composed of either:

  • (a) free flowing articles such as oil, grain, coal, ore and the like, which can be pumped or run through a chute or handled by dumping; or uniform cargo that generally must be shoveled, pumped, blown, scooped or forked in handling; or
  • (b) uniform cargo that stows as solidly as bulk cargo and requires mechanical handling for lading and discharging.

Break-bulk Cargo

2. Break-bulk cargo is commercial goods that are neither transported within a cargo container nor in bulk (e.g. grain stowed loosely in the vessel’s hold) and include goods such as oil and gas equipment, construction equipment, and automobiles.

For example, new and used vehicles will be classified as break bulk cargo. Although uniform in nature, vehicles have identifying marks (such as a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN)). One necessary aspect of bulk cargo is fungibility. The presence of a VIN removes that component from the shipment of new or used vehicles.

3. The difference between bulk and break-bulk cargo is not only based on the type of cargo, but also on the way in which the cargo is stowed or loaded. For example, goods stowed loosely in a hold (not in boxes or containers) will be considered bulk. Palletized boxes of those goods loaded directly into a hold (but not loose or containerized) will be considered break-bulk.

4. Marine carriers transporting break-bulk goods must transmit their electronic cargo and conveyance information 24-hours before the estimated arrival at a port in Canada.

Sample List of Bulk Cargo Commodities and Commodity Types

This list maybe changed and updated as deemed appropriate by the CBSA

  • Coils of steel and other metals
  • Rails of steel and other metals
  • Wire rods of steel and other metals (may be coiled or flat)
  • Ingots of metal (precious or otherwise)
  • Round bars of steel or other metal
  • Deformed Bars/Rebars (of metal)
  • Plates (of metal)
  • Billets (of metal)
  • Slabs (of metal)
  • Pipes (of metal)
  • Beams (of metal)
  • Tubes/Tubing (of metal)
  • Angles, shapes and sections (of metal)
  • Sheets (of metal)
  • Expanded metal
  • Flat bars (of metal)
  • Strand wire (of metal)
  • Sawn Timber/Lumber as a commodity (not as packaging material)
  • Paperboard/Fiberboard/Plywood as a commodity (not as packaging material)
  • Paper products as commodity (wood pulp, newsprint and paper rolls and not as packaging material)
  • Certain perishable goods, not in boxes, bags or containerized, and not frozen, but laden and stowed in a way similar to other types of bulk cargo (includes seafood and produce)
  • Blooms (similar to “billets” of metal)
  • Anodes/Cathodes, in sheets only (may be corrugated)

Appendix C

List of Contacts for Unscheduled Diversions

NTC
Calls within Canada and the United States
Telephone:
1-855-NTC-1CNC (1-855-682-1262) (24 hours a day, 7 days a week)

Overseas callers
Telephone: 1-613-941-0004 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week)

NTC Marine E-mail: nrac-aci@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

Technical Commercial Client Unit
1-888-957-7224 Calls within Canada and the U.S.
1-613-946-0762 for overseas callers

Regions:
Saint John, New Brunswick: atl_cbsa-asfc_targeting_sjnb-g@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca
St. John’s, Newfoundland: atl_cbsa-asfc_nl_operations-g@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca
Halifax, Nova Scotia: containerinquiries.atl-hfx@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca
Montréal, Quebec: mtl-smf-targets@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca
Prince Rupert, British Columbia: shared.princerupert@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca
Vancouver, British Columbia: 953npcu69g@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

Appendix D

Cargo Control Document Specifications (A6A, Freight/Cargo Manifest)

1. Privately printed cargo control documents must adhere to the format and specification instructions provided below. No deviation from the established format, as set out in the samples provided in this Appendix, will be permitted. Minor deviations, however, may be permitted in the field specifications, provided they do not impede the expeditious processing of the document by the CBSA.

2. Departmental approval is not required for the private printing of cargo control documents. However, a cargo control document that has been privately printed in a fashion which impedes its expeditious processing by the CBSA will be rejected by the CBSA for reporting purposes. In such instances, the carrier will have to reprint the cargo control document so that it meets CBSA requirements.

3. The CBSA continually assesses forms and procedures with a view to instituting improvements. It is recommended, therefore, that carriers limit the printing of their cargo control documents to a supply sufficient to cover a period no longer than twelve months. This would preclude having surplus stock on hand in the event of revisions to the form.

4. The CBSA will assist carriers in ensuring that their privately printed cargo control documents meet CBSA requirements.

5. Goods must be reported to CBSA on one of the following forms:

  • (a) an advice note aligned to the Economic Council of Europe (E.C.E.) layout (I.C.S. Bill of Lading format) with the inclusion of the carrier code, CCN and Entry/Acquittal Number fields in the upper and lower right corners of the document as per sample (1);
  • (b) an advice note aligned to sample (2);
  • (c) form A6A, Freight/Cargo Manifest, sample (3).

6. When the advice note is utilized as the support documentation to the paper form A6, General Declaration, inward report, the document set must provide for five CBSA copies to be placed in the following sequence:

  • 1. Station Copy
  • 2. Station Copy
  • 3. Station Copy
  • 4. Long Room Copy
  • 5. CBSA Delivery Authority Copy

7. When the advice note is utilized only for distribution to the importer/broker for presentation to CBSA for release, the document set must include two CBSA copies: Long Room and CBSA Delivery Authority.

8. All CBSA copies of the cargo control document are to be white in colour.

9. The copy designators as listed below are to be printed in the lower left corner of the CBSA copies:

  • 1. Station Copy
  • 2. Station Copy
  • 3. Station Copy
  • 4. To be delivered by consignee to CBSA Long Room Copy
  • 5. To be delivered by consignee to CBSA Delivery Authority Copy

10. The designation for the releasing Border Services Officer’s signature, as worded below, is to be printed on the face of the CBSA Delivery Authority copy in the lower right corner:

Note: The shipment described herein is now released to the warehouse operator.

Border Services Officer

11. Locations noted “Free Area” on the attached samples is for the carrier’s use, i.e., rates and charges.

12. Provision must be made for container number and vessel (shipped per) fields.

13. The document size of the cargo control document differs by the format used. The ICS Bill of Lading format must be between 17 and 19.5 cm wide and no more than 28 cm in length. The width excludes a maximum allowance of 2.5 cm for side margin tear offs and continuous feed pinholes. The advice note format aligned to sample (2) must be between 17 and 19.5 cm wide and between 14 and 28 cm in length. The width excludes a maximum allowance of 2.5 cm for side margin tear offs and continuous feed pinholes.

14. The field sizes for the additional information to be shown on the ICS Bill of Lading format are as follows:

Field Identifier/Width/Depth

  • Acquittal Number
    • 36/10 Standard
    • 30/10 Minimum
    • 6/6 Standard
  • Carrier Code
    • 8/10 Standard
    • 4/6 Standard
    • 3/6 Minimum
  • Cargo Control Number
    • 28/10 Standard
    • 22/10 Minimum
    • 4/6 Standard
    • 6/6 Standard
  • Copy Designator to document width
    • 4/6 Standard
    • 3/6 Minimum

15. The field sizes for the advice note format aligned to sample (2) are as follows:

Field Identifier/Width/Depth

  • Company logo, name and address
    • 53/10 Standard
    • 43/10 Minimum
    • 6/6 Standard
    • 4/6 Minimum
  • Acquittal No.
    • 30/10 Standard
    • 6/6 Standard
    • 4/6 Minimum
  • Manifested from
    • 25/10 Standard
    • 20/10 Minimum
    • 2/6 Standard to 25/10 Standard
    • 20/10 Minimum
    • 2/6 Standard
  • Consignee name and address
    • 51/10 Standard
    • 41/10 Minimum
    • 4/6 Standard

Field Identifier/Width/Depth

  • Carrier code
    • 8/10 Standard
    • 4/6 Standard
  • Cargo control number
    • 22/10 Standard
    • 4/6 Standard
  • Shipper name and address
    • 51/10 Standard
    • 41/10 Minimum
    • 4/6 Standard
  • Foreign point of lading
    • 30/10 Standard
    • 2/6 Standard
  • Location of goods
    • 30/10 Standard
    • 2/6 Standard
  • No. of packages
    • 7/10 Standard
    • 5/10 Minimum
    • 9/6 Standard
  • Description and marks
    • 33/10 Standard
    • 9/6 Standard
  • Weight
    • 81/10 Standard
    • 71/10 Minimum
    • 4/6 Standard
  • Copy designator
    • 81/10 Standard
    • 71/10 Minimum
    • 4/6 Standard
    • 3/6 Minimum

References

Issuing office :
Transporter and Cargo Control Programs Unit
Program and Policy Management Division
Commercial Program Directorate
Headquarters file :
7700-1
Other references :
D2-3-7, D3-1-1, D3-1-7, D3-1-8, D3-3-1, D3-4-2, D3-5-7, D3-6-6, D4-2-1, D8 series, D17-1-4, D20 Series, D22-1-1
International Waste Policy
CFIA Directive D98-08
Advance Commercial Information
Marine Electronic Commerce Client Requirements Document
Superseded memorandum D :
D3-5-1 dated August 13, 2008
D3-5-2 dated February 5, 2014
D12-1-1 dated March 12, 2014
Date modified: